Make a move to Baldoyle for the beach life

With the sea on its doorstep and a thriving community, this D13 district is set to grow

Baldoyle is not as highly developed as other coastal spots in the area. Photograph: Alan Betson

Baldoyle is not as highly developed as other coastal spots in the area. Photograph: Alan Betson

 

What’s so good about Baldoyle?

Want to be surrounded by three beaches, but still be within a roar of Dublin city centre? This northside suburb in Dublin 13 could well be the spot for you. Small enough to still foster a village community feeling (street parties are nothing out of the ordinary, for instance), Baldoyle boasts a library with sea views and a Lidl. Howth and Sutton, the former of which has a wider selection of bars and restaurants, are also nearby. The Baldoyle-to-Portmarnock cycleway is due to open this summer – another boon that has been keenly awaited by locals. Baldoyle’s community centre is also the perfect local hub, with yoga, bingo, Zumba and karate on offer to residents of all ages.

Baldoyle also boasts a thriving community garden with 60 members who rent out raised beds. A Tidy Towns group has recently been established and a large number of tree saplings have recently been planted. Plans for the further development of the racecourse park are also afoot.

What’s not so good?

Its village centre, though pretty, is not quite as developed as other coastal spots in the area. Baldoyle’s restaurant and cafe culture could do with a shot in the arm. Baldoyle has long been regarded as a neighbourhood at a more accessible price point than Sutton or Howth. Residents, too, have pointed out the downsides of coastal living, among them noisy seagulls and the threat of coastal erosion.

Yet, as is the case with many other areas, Baldoyle’s official parameters have shifted, thanks to estate agents: some Baldoyle properties now fall into the ‘Sutton’ category, with a price tag to match.

Where and what to buy?

You’re not likely to find a six-bedroom, 133sq m house this close to the coast with a €325,000 asking price, but 77 Newgrove Estate (via Sherry FitzGerald Sutton near Clongriffin Dart station, is certainly worth a look.

Closer to the sea, 50 Red Arches Drive (€375,000, via Gallagher Quigley) is a three-bed, two-bath duplex near Baldoyle Racecourse Community Garden.

Number 6 Stapolin Avenue at the Coast (€465,000, via Sherry FitzGerald Sutton ), provides an opportunity to buy a substantial four-bedroom semidetached house with a decent-sized garden.

Number 71 Admiral Park (€480,000, via Stuart McDonnell Properties), located in a quiet cul-de-sac, is a three-bed, two-bath semidetached with a modern kitchen extension.

Where and what to rent?

At the time of going to press, rentals in the area were scant on the ground – only two properties are listed on MyHome.ie in the area. Both of these are modern three-bed apartments, with a rental bill of about €1,800 a month. Usually, four-beds can be rented in the area for about €2,000-€2,100 a month, while one-bed properties can be secured for about €1,250-€1,500 a month.

Where to eat and drink?

Please note that some of these restaurants and cafes maybe be temporarily closed because of the coronavirus outbreak.

The Elphin (36 Baldoyle Road) is a pretty popular eating/drinking spot with locals. Locals have good things to say about Guilio’s chipper on Main Street. The White House, one of the few sit-down restaurants in the neighbourhood (12-13 Main Street), has been refurbished and now offers a brilliant Sunday brunch menu. For something a little more casual, the Coast Cafe at Sutton Dart station is a handy spot. Over at the Racecourse Shopping Centre, the Paddock Cafe (35 Seagrange Avenue) does a mean breakfast, and also has regular pizza and wine nights. Your new local, the Racecourse Inn on Grange Road, is a good option for families.

Who lives there?

More that a third of those living in Baldoyle are couples with children. MyHome puts the age breakdown of the area as follows: 20 per cent of residents are under 16; 28 per cent fall into the 16-34 age bracket; 23 per cent are aged between 35 and 49; 16 per cent are in the 50-64 category, and 13 per cent are over 65.

Good for families?

There are plenty of activities to keep kids active, among them the famous Baldoyle United football club, Arabian Gymnastics Club and Song & Dance Stage School. Seagrange Park includes a modern playground and sports pitches. Not far away, across the railway tracks, Sutton Park is smaller but every bit as pleasant.

In terms of schools, St Mary’s (Catholic, girls) is in the middle of the village, while Pobalscoil Neasáin (Catholic, co-ed) is a little further inland. St Laurence’s National School (Catholic, mixed) is also on the area, although classes are split between buildings on Brookstone Road and Grange Road. Also in the village area is the well-regarded primary school for children with special needs, run by St Michael’s House.

Getting there and getting around

Served well by Dublin Bus and Irish Rail, Baldoyle is accessed via Sutton and Bayside Dart stations, and via Clongriffin on the northern branch. The Dublin Bus routes 29A, 32, 32X and 102 and Nitelinks 29N and 31N pass through the area.

A 25-minute drive, depending on traffic, will get you to Baldoyle from the city centre. Expect the Dart to get you there in about 20 minutes, and a bus journey to take 35 minutes.

What do locals say?

“Some years ago we were considering selling and moving elsewhere but in the end decided to stay on, the main reasons being the quiet neighbourhood, friendly neighbours and closeness to nature. From our house it’s less than a five-minute walk to the seafront.

“When you reach the seafront you can choose between two scenic walks. Turn left and head towards Portmarnock, you will be spotted by the Scottish Highland cows grazing and you can try out the new cycle path while enjoying the view of the bay towards Portmarnock village. Baldoyle is a lovely place to live, and we are truly blessed with choices of walks, closeness to nature and beaches and amazing views over the sea which makes you want to go out for walks in all kinds of weather all year round.” Eva Sharry, office administrator.

Do you live in Ringsend/Irishtown, Dublin 4? If so please tell us what it’s like to live there. Do you have a favourite place or a pet peeve in the neighbourhood? Email homeanddesign@irishtimes.com

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