GAA MAAD review: Gaelic games go GAAY

Dublin Fringe Festival: Vickey Curtis and Áine O’Hara practice their own version of inclusivity

GAA MAAD: a potted history of the GAA and a list of the commercial sponsors of Dublin Pride. Photograph: Ste Murray

GAA MAAD: a potted history of the GAA and a list of the commercial sponsors of Dublin Pride. Photograph: Ste Murray

 

GAA MAAD

Bewley’s Cafe Theatre
★★★☆☆
Vickey Curtis and Aine O’Hara are GAA MAAD. The problem is they are both GAAY and the Gaelic Athletic Association is not known for its diversity. The organisation may have participated in Dublin’s Pride festival for the first time this year, but, as Curtis and O’Hara explore in their 40 minute performance, that is very different from diversity. GAA MAAD meditates on a variety of related and diffuse themes, using the writer’s own experiences to provide, among other things, a potted history of the GAA and a list of the commercial sponsors for Dublin Pride. What it lacks in focus, however, it makes up for in spirit, as the women practice their own version of inclusivity, rousing the audience with their county cheers. O’Hara’s surprising design, which lays out the auditorium like a pitch and hangs the Pride flag alongside her county colours, deserves special commendation, although she would surely prefer an All-Ireland medal for Mayo rather than the compliment. 

Runs as part of the Dublin Fringe Festival until Saturday, September 21st