‘Working remotely requires more individual contact, not less’

Management’s big flaw is holding too many group video calls while ignoring individuals

Best practice for management is to respect boundaries, not least because many people are juggling caring responsibilities with working from home.

Best practice for management is to respect boundaries, not least because many people are juggling caring responsibilities with working from home.

“The last six months have been like playing a game of chess where all the pieces can move in any direction, even the pawns,” says one middle manager in financial services. “My team has changed twice and I’ve had little or no say in the selection process. I’ve ended up with a very mixed group who don’t know each other and have different expectations and levels of experience. None of us has worked from home before and I’m supposed make it all work seamlessly on Zoom while not dropping the ball on productivity.”

 This is not untypical of the situation many of those now running distributed teams find themselves in. Working from home sounded great in theory and initially everyone was upbeat about being able to work from the sofa in their PJs if they felt like it. But it hasn’t taken long for the realities of remote working to kick in and for people to realise how much we rely on formal and informal interactions to provide stability and structure during the working day.

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