Next Generation Recruitment to create 80 jobs

Expansion in Dublin and Krakow intended to win bigger client accounts in Europe

Next Generation founder and chief executive Linda Davis: said a talent shortage is driving salaries up in Ireland.

Next Generation founder and chief executive Linda Davis: said a talent shortage is driving salaries up in Ireland.

 

Next Generation Recruitment is to create 80 new jobs in Dublin and Krakow over the next two years.

Most of the jobs will be aimed at technical professionals, with the company seeking to recruit software developers, data scientists and digital marketers.

The company employs 35 staff in Dublin and eight in Poland.

Next Generation founder and chief executive Linda Davis said the company was expanding in order to win bigger client accounts in Europe and to be able to service them across Europe.

She said the Dublin office is currently recruiting and intends to hire an additional 10 employees by the end of 2016 and 20 more by end of 2017.

The company intends to grow its Krakow business from a current headcount of eight by hiring 20 additional employees by the end of 2016 and another 30 by the end of 2017.

Expansion

The positions will be based in a purpose-built sourcing centre which Next Generation opened in April this year.

The expansion also includes a Krakow-based centre of excellence team, which will target IT and data science roles.

Ms Davis said there has been noticeable growth in the recruitment industry with unemployment rates across most sectors decreasing and competition for talent increasing.

She said there are major opportunities in Ireland for organisations who embrace the whole area of data science, who invest in talented analysts who can fully disseminate the massive amounts of data that organisations now have access to.

“It will very soon affect all aspects of our lives from our health, to what we consume and even how we will vote in the future.”

Educational levels

She said a talent shortage is driving salaries up in Ireland, adding shared services centres – which have been very important to Ireland – might begin migrating to eastern Europe.

“The educational levels are getting stronger in eastern Europe, their English is improving, and cost bases are much lower there.”