Potential engine fault will not delay Norwegian Air launch

Boeing halts flights of 737 Max, but Norwegian’s Irish-US service to go ahead, says airline

The Boeing 737 Max: The US airline manufacturer said  that a possible flaw in an engine part had come to light during an inspection at its suppliers. Photograph: Jason Redmond/AFP/Getty Images

The Boeing 737 Max: The US airline manufacturer said that a possible flaw in an engine part had come to light during an inspection at its suppliers. Photograph: Jason Redmond/AFP/Getty Images

 

Norwegian Air International says that the discovery of a potential flaw in the engines of one the latest Boeing aircraft will not delay the launch of its planned Irish-US flights.

Boeing has temporarily suspended flights of its new 737 Max aircraft, which Norwegian plans to use on its Irish routes, after detecting a potential minor fault in the engines.

The airline said that the delay is likely to push back the delivery of the craft that it will use on the Irish routes, but added that it would not affect the launch of the services themselves.

“Norwegian has been informed of the temporary pause in the testing of the Boeing 737 Max,” a spokesman said.

“Boeing has given us a new delivery date of our first Max, which is a few days later than previous estimates. However, this will not delay the launch of our upcoming transatlantic routes from Ireland to the US.”

Inspection

The US airline manufacturer said this week that a possible flaw in an engine part had come to light during an inspection at its suppliers, a joint venture between General Electric and Safran.

Boeing added that the new craft remained on schedule for delivery later this month.

Industry analysts suggested that the disruption caused is unlikely to last long and that the manufacturers would iron out the problem quickly. One described it as a bump on the road.

Norwegian Air will be one of the first carriers to fly the Boeing 737 Max craft commercially.

The craft is predicted to be one of the fastest-selling models ever launched by Boeing.

The Irish Times Logo
Commenting on The Irish Times has changed. To comment you must now be an Irish Times subscriber.
SUBSCRIBE
GO BACK
Error Image
The account details entered are not currently associated with an Irish Times subscription. Please subscribe to sign in to comment.
Comment Sign In

Forgot password?
The Irish Times Logo
Thank you
You should receive instructions for resetting your password. When you have reset your password, you can Sign In.
The Irish Times Logo
Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.
Screen Name Selection

Hello

Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.

The Irish Times Logo
Commenting on The Irish Times has changed. To comment you must now be an Irish Times subscriber.
SUBSCRIBE
Forgot Password
Please enter your email address so we can send you a link to reset your password.

Sign In

Your Comments
We reserve the right to remove any content at any time from this Community, including without limitation if it violates the Community Standards. We ask that you report content that you in good faith believe violates the above rules by clicking the Flag link next to the offending comment or by filling out this form. New comments are only accepted for 3 days from the date of publication.