Qualtrics to double the size of its Dublin headquarters

US software company says it is to take on additional 1,000 employees across Europe

Software company Qualtrics says it is to double the size of its Dublin headquarters as part of a major new expansion that will see it taking on an additional 1,000 employees across Europe.

The expanded Europe, Middle East and Africa (EMEA) headquarters will include a brand-new research and development hub to drive product innovation.

Qualtrics, which currently employs 300 people in Dublin, announced plans to create 350 jobs in here in 2018 to bring staff numbers to 600. However, it has yet to significantly increase headcount locally despite announcing 100 addutional jobs a year later.

It said on Monday it now expects to have 650 employees in Dublin by 2024.The company was founded by brothers Ryan and Jared Smith along with their father Scott, and Stuart Orgill in Provo, Utah, in 2002. It is a provider of cloud-based software that lets organisations create online surveys and track employee satisfaction and customer interactions.

More than 13,500 companies use Qualtrics's software, it says, including Airbus, Merck and Braun. The company was acquired by German software giant SAP for $8 billion in 2018, but went public earlier this year. The Utah-headquartered company employs 4,000 people globally.

Qualtric said it plans to more than double its EMEA workforce in the next three years, with the company hiring across all of its major hubs - Dublin, London, Paris, Munich, Amsterdam and Krakow - and across all functions, including sales, professional services engineering, operations, customer success, and marketing.

“Experience data is becoming the most valuable data within an organisation, and Qualtrics has a 10-year head start in this market,” said chief executive Zig Serafin.

“The investments we’re making today will help us grow across EMEA, and ensure we continue to help our customers build their next great customer, employee, product, and brand experiences.”

Charlie Taylor

Charlie Taylor

Charlie Taylor is a former Irish Times business journalist

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