Microsoft seeks to increase consumer trust in cloud computing

Tech giant’s CEO Satya Nadella tells Dublin event of firm’s $3bn investment in the cloud

Satya Nadella, chief executive officer of Microsoft: said it has invested $3 billion in cloud computing in Europe, and said it would begin to offer cloud services from data centres based in France from 2017.

Satya Nadella, chief executive officer of Microsoft: said it has invested $3 billion in cloud computing in Europe, and said it would begin to offer cloud services from data centres based in France from 2017.

 

Tech giant Microsoft has invested $3 billion in cloud computing in Europe, it says and will begin to offer cloud services from data centres based in France from 2017.

The company made the announcement at its Tech Gathering in Dublin with Microsoft chief executive Satya Nadella taking to the stage to deliver the news.

“Cloud computing is not just a single destination,” he said, outlining the company’s plans for a global hyper-scale cloud.

“We now have over 30 regions across all parts of the globe, making sure there is access to the cloud.”

Transforming Microsoft into a mobile-first, cloud-first entity has been one of Mr Nadella’s key strategies for the 41-year-old tech firm.

The push towards cloud computing has seen Microsoft more than double its computing capacity to deliver such services in Europe.

Among its investments has been a growth in the number of data centres it operates in the region, including Ireland and Britain, and Mr Nadella said he didn’t see any impact from the UK’s decision to leave the European Union on the company’s commitment to the region.

In Germany, where Microsoft opened two data centres in recent months, it has an arrangement that sees a subsidiary of Deutsche Telekom control access to customer data.

Responsible

Meanwhile, Microsoft has turned its attention to making the cloud more inclusive, trusted and responsible, publishing a book that contains more than 78 recommendations for public policy to achieve this end.

“With any new technology like the cloud, one of the profound things that happens is change, rapid change and disruptive change,” Mr Nadella said.

“It is incumbent on companies like Microsoft and broader tech community and governments to have the broader dialogue where we look at technology and ask the question: is this technology going to benefit everyone on the planet? Will this tech help solve some of the pressing issues?”

Mr Nadella said the book was a concrete step the company was taking to propose a set of ideals and policy considerations for a broader discussion that would help come up with ways that these disruptive technologies can help global growth in a way that is more trusted, responsible and inclusive.

“Cloud computing has the potential to solve some of our world’s most challenging issues, but, as with all technological advancements, it raises important questions for society,” said Brad Smith, microsoft president. “We must work together to build a cloud for global good.”

He said the policies set in place over the next two years would define how people experience cloud in the next 20 years.