Google’s Dublin data centre goes ‘net zero on waste’

Dublin data centre one of six of tech giant’s facilities with no waste going to landfill

Google opened its first data centre in Dublin in 2012. A second data centre opened earlier this year.

Google opened its first data centre in Dublin in 2012. A second data centre opened earlier this year.

 

Google has said its Dublin-based data centre is one of six facilities worldwide that has successfully managed to ensure that none of its waste goes to landfill.

The tech giant, which operates 14 data centres globally, said the Dublin facility, along with sites in Finland, Belgium, Taiwan, Singapore and Oklahoma in the United States, has achieved a 100 per cent diversion rate, with no more than 10 per cent of it going to a waste-to-energy site.

Globally, the company is currently diverting at least 86 per cent of waste away from landfills, it said.

Zero waste to landfill

Google said it was working towards “zero waste to landfill” at all its facilities, and was also seeking to reduce the amount of waste it produces.

“Zero waste to landfill is just the first step in a long process to sustainably manage our resources throughout the entire life cycle of our data centres,” it said.

Google opened its first data centre in Dublin in 2012. A second data centre opened earlier this year as part of a €150 million investment.