200 jobs for Galway as Genesys expands its workforce

Customer services tech firm will also open AI centre of excellence

Genesys’s Barry O’Sullivan said the centre was significant for the Irish operation. Photograph: iStock

Genesys’s Barry O’Sullivan said the centre was significant for the Irish operation. Photograph: iStock

 

Customer service technology firm Genesys is to create 200 tech jobs at its Galway office over the next three years.

The global company, which bought Irish firm Altocloud earlier this year, is also establishing a global artificial intelligence centre of excellence in Ireland, which it claims is poised to be one of Ireland’s largest AI development centres.

Genesys’s Barry O’Sullivan said the centre was significant for the Irish operation. “Genesys does R&D all over the world, so this is a major win,” he said. A lot of the new expertise was being based on technology that was acquired from Altocloud, he said.

The new jobs will be a mix of senior and highly skilled technical roles in research and development, machine learning, software engineering, user experience and data science. Recruitment has already begun for the roles, with about 30 already filled. When Genesys acquired Altocloud, the Galway-based firm employed 20 people; the Irish firm now employs 50 people.

Talent

“Ireland has a rich base of technical talent and is a tremendous place to do business. As we continue to evolve our AI innovations that integrate with Kate, the Genesys AI Platform, it’s critical that we have the right team in place,” said Paul Segre, Genesys chief executive. “That’s why Galway is the perfect location for our global Centre of Excellence for Customer Experience AI. We couldn’t be more excited to continue our growth and create quality jobs in Ireland.”

The news was welcomed by Sean Kyne, Government chief whip and TD for Galway West.

Genesys will work with Irish universities and institutes of technology on positions for graduates with technical and data science skills. However, Mr O Sullivan was confident that the company would also be able to attract senior talent in Galway, Dublin and overseas. While Dublin would remain the first choice for many in the tech industry, he said Galway was the first place people thought of when they were seeking an alternative to the capital.

The investment is being supported by the Government through IDA Ireland.

“The investment Genesys is making in Ireland is a testament to the quality of technical expertise in AI that our region has to offer,” said Martin Shanahan, chief executive IDA Ireland. “AI is an area of huge growth globally and Ireland has a significant opportunity to build upon the vibrant cluster of companies operating in this area.”