Irish-Korean partnership begins work on €100m electricity project

Lumcloon Energy joins forces with Hanwha Energy to build two plants in Co Offaly

The Lumcloon-Hanwha project is one of the biggest of its kind in Europe.

The Lumcloon-Hanwha project is one of the biggest of its kind in Europe.

 

An Irish-Korean partnership has begun work on a €100 million project that will store electricity in what is one of the biggest developments of its kind in Europe.

Irish-based Lumcloon Energy has joined forces with Korea’s Hanwha Energy to build two plants in Co Offaly that will store enough electricity to power about 100,000 homes.

The pair have begun work on the facilities at Lumcloon and Shannonbridge, Co Offaly, that will house batteries similar to those found in electric cars to store power that can be used at times of peak demand.

The plants will have a combined capacity to hold 100 megawatts of electricity, making the the Lumcloon-Hanwha project one of the biggest of its kind in Europe. They are spending €100 million on the development.

Battery storage is generally used to “balance” supply from electricity, often generated from green sources such as wind farms, with demand for power from homes and businesses.

Electricity generated by wind farms during periods of low demand can be stored and used later when customers need power.

The technology is common in Europe, particularly in countries that depend heavily on renewable electricity. Reports say that up to 120 people will be employed in building the Co Offaly facilities.