Green light for 260 apartments at Belmayne in north Dublin

Developer proposes selling 26 social housing units to council for €7m – three-bed for €336,317

An artist’s impression of the Belmayne apartment development.

An artist’s impression of the Belmayne apartment development.

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An Bord Pleanála has given the green light to “fast-track” plans for 260 apartments at Belmayne in north Dublin.

The appeals board has granted planning permission to Balgriffin Ltd for the Strategic Housing Development (SHD) scheme that rises to seven storeys in height. The scheme comprises 108 one-bed units, 135 two-bed and 17 three-bed.

The site is located adjacent to the existing Belmayne estate on the corner of Churchwell Road and Churchwell Crescent in Dublin 13.

In compliance with its social housing obligations, the developer is proposing to sell 26 apartments for €7 million to Dublin City Council for social housing.

Negotiations can now take place between the two sides on a final price for the apartments with planning permission now granted.

In its social housing sale proposal, the developer has put an indicative price tag of €336,317 on a three-bed unit.

One third-party submission supported by 53 individuals lodged with An Bord Pleanála expressed concern over the impact of the development on sunlight and daylight because of the height of buildings proposed and the strain that will be placed on existing facilities.

Conditions

Dublin City Council recommended that planning permission be granted subject to 10 conditions.

An Bord Pleanála inspector Stephen Rhys Thomas stated that the scheme is located at a well-served urban location close to a variety of amenities. He was satisfied that the location and design of the taller elements of the scheme was acceptable and accorded with wider strategic and national planning parameters.

In its formal order, the appeals board ruled that the scheme would not seriously injure the residential or visual amenities of the area or of property in the vicinity. 

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