150 expected to attend DCU’s business matchmaker event

Event presents companies with opportunity to meet experts of many industry sectors

Boxer Katie Taylor: Olympic champion is due to address the I Wish conference in Cork, which aims to encourage more women to consider careers in science, technology, engineering and maths. Photograph:  Brian Lawless/PA Wire

Boxer Katie Taylor: Olympic champion is due to address the I Wish conference in Cork, which aims to encourage more women to consider careers in science, technology, engineering and maths. Photograph: Brian Lawless/PA Wire

 

Dublin City University will host its second annual business matchmaker next week, but this Wednesday is the last day to register.

More than 150 people are expected to attend the event, which aims to give companies the opportunity to meet with experts who are engaged in research across many industry sectors including ICT and Digital Services, Internet of Things, Lifesciences & Health and Energy & Environmental Sustainability.

Attendees will be given a schedule of meetings in advance and will have the opportunity to outline challenges they are facing, ideas they are exploring and discuss various options to collaborate and fund future R&D projects through state and European supports.

Two companies – Oriel Sea Salt and IT Solutions - which have successfully collaborated with DCU since last year’s event will share their journey on the day.

Trinity Biotech chief scientific officer and adjunct Professor at DCU, Dr Jim Walsh, will highlight the research capabilities available to businesses at DCU.

Elsewhere, Olympic champion Katie Taylor is due to address the I Wish conference in Cork this Thursday. The conference is aiming to encourage more women to consider careers in science, technology, engineering and maths, with 2,000 students from schools across Cork, Kerry, Limerick and Waterford expected to attend.

The students will hear from female leaders in Dell, PepsiCo, Google, Vodafone and Twitter about tech and science careers for women.

In 2014, just 17 per cent of entrants to third level courses in ICT were female, while only 24 per cent of engineering entrants were female.