Prof Alex (Archie)Thompson (retired), Emeritus Professor Luke Drury, DIAS, Hillary O’Donnell (former technician) at the launch at Dublin Institute of Advanced Studies of the programme of events for July to mark the 50th anniversary of the first humans landing on the moon as part of NASA’s Apollo 11 mission. Photograph Nick Bradshaw for The Irish Times

Apollo 11 has a very special place in the history of Irish space research. Irish hands were among the first to take possession and evaluate moon rock (...)

The sun was used as an ‘all-natural laboratory’ in the team’s study of plasma. The sun, above Oceanside in California. File photograph: Mike Blake/Reuters

New insights into how matter behaves in the extreme conditions of the Sun’s atmosphere have been discovered by a team of Irish and French scientists. (...)

A photo provided by NASA of composite image of Mars. Photograph: NASA/The New York Times

Big hugs, fist bumps and broad smiles at mission control greeted confirmation that the Nasa probe InSight successfully landed on Mars – just before 8 (...)

Physicist and author Carlo Rovelli: ‘what is very typical of science is that the more we learn the more we don’t know’

Leading physicist and author Carlo Rovelli, whose work has been translated into 41 different languages, is back with a new book, The Order of Time. Ro(...)

Simon Meehan and his science teacher, Karina Lyne. Much of the criticism  for the winner came from people passing judgment on a piece of sound science that had hallmarks of brilliance, even though they had not read it

The court of social media put Ireland’s much-celebrated and internationally-renowned Young Scientist competition in the dock this week with accusation(...)

Structures such as Newgrange remain wonderful feats of calculation and engineering of our ancestors. Photograph: Alan Betson

In the most recent research investigating Europeans’ attitudes towards science, 70 per cent of people surveyed agreed that having an interest in scie(...)

Steorn CEO Shaun McCarthy with the company’s “everlasting/self-charging” battery whose technology could be adapted to power smartphones in about a year. (Photograph: Eric Luke / The Irish Times) Steorn chief executive  Shaun McCarthy with the company’s “everlasting/self-charging” battery, whose technology could reportedly be adapted to power smartphones in about a year. Photograph: Alan Betson/The Irish Times

When he bribes the golden-ticket winning children in Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, Arthur Slugworth wants just one thing: the ever-lasting gobsto(...)

Water services is one of the five main areas of expertise of Geoscience Ireland member companies

A network of Irish engineering companies set up in 2010 as a response to the economic downturn has helped member companies win a series of high-profil(...)

Dr Dorota Wencel, Dublin City University, and Kerry Naughton of BlueBridge Technologies: their project will focus on the development of a critical care monitor for vulnerable patients

The Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) Industry Research Fellowship programme offers post-graduate researchers in higher education institutions around I(...)

We may not be Iceland or Sicily. We have no active volcanoes or regular seismic activity. But that does not mean we cannot exploit the geothermal p(...)