Andrew Coscoran puts himself back in the mix for Tokyo Games

At the same meeting Sarah Healy also scored another impressive win

Ireland’s Andrew Coscoran. Photo: Morgan Treacy/Inpho

Ireland’s Andrew Coscoran. Photo: Morgan Treacy/Inpho

 

Andrew Coscoran put himself right back in contention for Tokyo qualification after running the fastest 1,500 metres by an Irish athlete in eight years, also moving himself into number eight on the Irish all-time list.

Running on Sunday evening at the World Athletics Continental Tour meeting in Sollentuna, Sweden, Coscoran improved his best to 3:35.66, finishing a close second to Kenya’s Vincent Keter, the fastest by an Irish man since the 3:35.22 run by fellow Dublin Track Club runner Paul Robinson in September 2013.

At the same meeting Sarah Healy also scored another impressive win, the 20-year-old winning the women’s 1,500m in personal best of 4:07.12, and is now well on track to Tokyo qualification in her event.

Coscoran had dropped just outside the 45-athlete quota for the 1,500m in Tokyo, based on time or ranking, his 3:35.66 likely to move him back into contention just two weeks before the cut-off date.

Back at home, the national road walk championships took place in Tuam, and saw the men’s 20k title going to of David Kenny (Farranfore Maine Valley) who came home in 1:28:03 ahead of Brendan Boyce 1:29:49 (Finn Valley AC), and Jerome Caprice 1:34:28 (Dundrum South Dublin AC).

Kate Veale (West Waterford AC) collected the Women’s 20k Walk title in what were seriously humid conditions at the stunning St. Jarlath’s College venue in Tuam.

Among the highlights at the AAI Games in Santry, a strong pace from the start saw eventual winner Efrem Gidey (Clonliffe Harriers AC) cross the line in 8:11.57, closely followed by Cormac Dalton (Mullingar Harriers A.C.) in 8:11.68.

At the same meeting, Mark English also reinforced his Tokyo ranking with a brilliant win in the 800m clocking an excellent 1:45.70.

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