Camogie Association release three-year national plan

12 key goals outlined across the areas of games, volunteers, identity and leadership

Action from a recent challenge match between Ahane and Killimordaly in Co Limerick. Photograph: Tommy Dickson/Inpho

Action from a recent challenge match between Ahane and Killimordaly in Co Limerick. Photograph: Tommy Dickson/Inpho

 

The National Camogie Association has released its national plan for the next three years. Based on an extensive consultation process it is themed ‘Passion, People, Pride and Place’ and contains 12 key goals across the areas of games, volunteers, identity and leadership.

At present there are 578 clubs in the country and more than 100,000 players nationwide.

The new plan builds on the progress of previous ones and was drawn up following a thorough consultation process which engaged with “over 800 individuals representing all 32 counties and more than 280 clubs, as well as funders, sponsors, partners and other stakeholders”.

Among the recommendations are to enhance the working relationship with the other Gaelic games authorities in women’s football and the GAA, encouraging players to remain involved in the association and to revitalise the sport’s identity through measures such as analysis of “the current Camogie Association brand identity through consultation with members and implement actions towards a rebrand of the association”.

Also included are plans to improve the quality of the game at all levels, playing facilities and the standard of refereeing.

“Our National Development Plan is a vital strategy for the association that will guide all that we do in the next four years at both a staff and volunteer level,” according to director general Sinéad McNulty .

“We are an ambitious organisation and this plan will provide all of our stakeholders with clear guidance and direction to achieve even greater success and further the development of our wonderful game.”

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