All Blacks returning to the pack; Mayo’s many mistakes against Dublin

Morning Sports Briefing: Keep ahead of the game with ‘The Irish Times’ sports team

Joey Carbery of Ireland is taken off the field at the Aviva Stadium on Saturday. Photograph: Dan Mullan/Getty Images

Joey Carbery of Ireland is taken off the field at the Aviva Stadium on Saturday. Photograph: Dan Mullan/Getty Images

The full extent of the ankle injury suffered by Joey Carbery against Italy on Saturday remains unclear, with the Irish management awaiting further tests prior to clarifying the outhalf’s wellbeing today. In his column this morning, Gerry Thornley explains why, uneasy lies New Zealand’s World Cup crown: “The feeling that this year’s World Cup is undoubtedly the most openly competitive in yonks, perhaps ever, was strengthened by the events of the weekend. Not alone have almost all of the chasing peleton made strides in recent times, but the back-to-back world champions New Zealand have come back to them.”

Kevin McStay’s weekly column (Subscriber Only) is addressing Mayo’s many mistakes against Dublin: “Dublin got 26 shots away and Mayo got 24 shots. Again, no great disparity. But of those totals, Dublin were successful with 17 and Mayo just 11. It was 65 per cent against 46 per cent in terms of accuracy. And 65 is quite low by Dublin standards: they are often in the high 70s or low 80s.” Ahead of Sunday’s All-Ireland hurling final, Sean Moran profiles Kilkenny goalkeeper Eoin Murphy, a jack of all trades and master of one who by consensus is the best goalkeeper in hurling: “An unusual aspect of Murphy’s achievements is that he has won highest honours playing in completely different positions: as goalkeeper with Kilkenny, as a forward with club Glenmore in their All-Ireland junior club victory, and as a centre back in the 2014 Fitzgibbon Cup final when captain of Waterford IT.”

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