Residential home run by HSE adviser on disability criticised for lapses in care

Kildare centre in breach of regulations over care planning and use of chemical restraint

Mountain View centre in Newbridge: inspectors said some staff lacked mandatory training and sufficient safeguards to prevent potential abuse of vulnerable residents.

Mountain View centre in Newbridge: inspectors said some staff lacked mandatory training and sufficient safeguards to prevent potential abuse of vulnerable residents.

 

A residential centre for people with disabilities, run by the head of a Health Service Executive inquiry into abuse at the Áras Attracta care centre in Swinford, Co Mayo, has been criticised for lapses in care standards.

An inspection by the Health Information and Quality Authority (Hiqa) has found the five-bed centre in Co Kildare was in breach of regulations relating to issues such as safeguards over the chemical restraint of residents.

The Mountain View centre in Newbridge is run by KARE, which is headed up by Christy Lynch. Mr Lynch was appointed by the HSE last December to investigate allegations of abuse at the Áras Attracta residential centre for people with disabilities run by the HSE.

The Co Kildare centre is the second residential unit operated by KARE to face criticism by Hiqa in the space of a year.

Vulnerable residents

Mr Lynch has played a key role in the development of disability services and was the main author of a major HSE report several years ago, which recommended the closure of institutional settings for people with disabilities. He was unavailable for comment yesterday.

The latest Hiqa report found the centre in Newbridge failed to comply with seven out of 11 care regulations it was inspected against.

Relevant experience

Improvements were also required to the administration of chemical restraint medication, which was being given “as required” in response to challenging behaviour by residents.

In addition, the system of individualised assessment and care planning was not effective and did not sufficiently support the wellbeing and welfare of residents.

It said the system of assessment needed to be more multidisciplinary to reflect the full needs of residents.

On a positive note, inspectors found that residents received care and support aimed at assisting them to lead independent lives, and residents were assisted to take part in meaningful activities. Rooms were found to be comfortably furnished.