New law means public servants can work until they are 70

Compulsory retirement age of most public servants recruited before 2004 will increase

 ‘Any public servant covered by the legislation who has not already reached their compulsory retirement age will have a new compulsory retirement age of 70.’ Photograph: Nick Bradshaw/The Irish Times

‘Any public servant covered by the legislation who has not already reached their compulsory retirement age will have a new compulsory retirement age of 70.’ Photograph: Nick Bradshaw/The Irish Times

 

Legislation that will allow public servants stay at work up to the age of 70 if they choose to, has been signed into law by President Michael D Higgins.

Public servants previously had to retire by 65, though interim measures allowed staff be re-hired until the age of 66, when they qualified for the State pension.

However, these staff were treated as newly employed, therefore resulting in a drop in income despite doing the same work.

The Public Service Superannuation (Age of Retirement) Bill completed its passage through the Seanad last week and was signed into law by President Higgins on Wednesday.

The law provides for an increase in the compulsory retirement age of most public servants recruited before April 1st, 2004.

Trade union Forsa, which represents public service workers, previously raised concerns that the legislation could be delayed until 2019, and those who turned 65 over the Christmas break “would be forced to retire”.

“Once the Bill comes into effect, any public servant covered by the legislation who has not already reached their compulsory retirement age will have a new compulsory retirement age of 70 and the choice to work to that age if they so wish,” a Forsa spokesperson said last week.