ISPCA chief executive stands down

Andrew Kelly’s exit from charity follows suspension and reinstatment of two colleagues

Andrew Kelly has stood down as CEO  of the ISPCA. File photograph: Eric Luke/The Irish Times

Andrew Kelly has stood down as CEO of the ISPCA. File photograph: Eric Luke/The Irish Times

 

The Irish Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals’ (ISPCA) Board of Directors has confirmed that its chief executive Andrew Kelly no longer works for the society.

The development comes following a period of turmoil at the charity in which two board members, including chairperson Fiona Squibb, were suspended pending the outcome of a grievance procedure. It is understood both members were reinstated in recent weeks.

In a statement, the ISPCA said: “The Board of Directors of the Irish Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ISPCA) wish to confirm that the CEO no longer works for the Society.

“The management, staff and volunteers will continue to work together, looking after the welfare of animals throughout the country”.

In proceedings against the ISPCA earlier this month, Ms Squibb claimed before the High Court that her suspension from the charity’s board was unlawful, unfair and fundamentally flawed.

Ms Squibb claimed, following her appointment, Mr Kelly went on sick leave for medical stress.

In late December, Ms Squibb claimed Mr Kelly sought to return to work but he sent a letter demanding she and another director resign or else he would raise a grievance with the Charities Regulator.

Mr Kelly, she claimed, had expressed his dissatisfaction with her election as chair and had long sought her removal as a director. She claimed, as chair, she remained professional in her approach towards him.

Following his return to work, she claimed he submitted a grievance about her to the ISPCA board and claimed she had undermined his position. She and another director were suspended pending the outcome of a grievance procedure.

When the case came before Ms Justice Leonie Reynolds, the judge urged Ms Squibb to consider mediating her dispute with the ISPCA.

The judge said she was making no order at this stage, given the costs involved with High Court litigation, and because Ms Squibb is a volunteer who does not receive any payment for what she does for the ISPCA.