Swimmers warned of ‘highly venomous’ jellyfish on east coast

Portuguese man o’war jellyfish discovered on Carne beach in Wexford

A closeup of the jellyfish in the Mediterranean off the coast of the southern Lebanese city of Sidon Wednesday. Photograph: Mohamed Sareji/AP Photo

A closeup of the jellyfish in the Mediterranean off the coast of the southern Lebanese city of Sidon Wednesday. Photograph: Mohamed Sareji/AP Photo

 

Swimmers heading to the beach today have been warned to be careful about a new breed of jellyfish that is “highly venomous.”

John Leech of Irish Water Safety told RTÉ’s Morning Ireland that in recent years the Lion’s Mane jellyfish has become more plentiful in the waters around Ireland with reported sightings all along the east coast - in Louth, Meath, Dublin, Wicklow, Wexford.

“It is a venomous jellyfish - we have nine to ten jellyfish that visit us regularly, but because of spring tides you tend to see more on beaches, children will start poking at them, the Lion’s Mane jellyfish has very strong venom.

“Some people are vulnerable to anaphylactic shock, that’s the great danger.”

Mr Leech also said that they had received a report last night of a Portuguese man o’war jellyfish on Carne beach in Wexford - “it is even more venomous than the Lion’s Mane jellyfish”.

He warned bathers to stay well away from them. The Irish Water Safety website - www.iws.ie - has an ID card of jellyfish and treatments.

“If you get stung go to a life guard for treatment.”