Cork Institute of Technology president likely to step down early

Move appears to follow concerns over public sector staff working beyond retirement age

 Dr Brendan Murphy: he was due to serve as CIT  president  until August 2019 under a five-year contract he signed in 2014. Photograph: Neil Danton

Dr Brendan Murphy: he was due to serve as CIT president until August 2019 under a five-year contract he signed in 2014. Photograph: Neil Danton

 

The president of Cork Institute of Technology has signalled he will step down from his position two years earlier than planned following concerns he was due to work well beyond the normal retirement age.

The statutory retirement age for members of the public service is generally 65.

Dr Brendan Murphy – who will turn 65 shortly – was due to serve as CIT president in the €146,000-a-year post until August 2019 under a five-year contract he signed in 2014.

CIT has been in discussion with the Department of Education over the contract in recent months to smooth the way for him to work beyond his retirement age. However, it is understood Dr Murphy informed the institute’s governing body last week he plans to step down in 2017 when a successor has been recruited.

In response to a query from The Irish Times, a CIT spokeswoman said: “Discussions are ongoing between CIT and the Department of Education and until such time as they conclude it would be inappropriate to comment.”

University status

CIT is understood to have argued that Dr Murphy is legally entitled to service beyond normal retirement on contract and age-discrimination grounds.

However, the department has been pushing for a compromise arrangement, with some concerns over potential implications for other members of the public sector at retirement age.

Dr Murphy was first appointed president in September 2004. In advance of the completion of his 10-year term of office in 2014, CIT’s governing body ran a recruitment competition for the position of president for a five-year period.

Dr Murphy was reappointed and began his new contract in 2014. The institute has insisted there were no additional pension or other costs associated with his appointment.

Stage three

Munster