Michael Lynn to be extradited from Brazil to Ireland

Former solicitor to face charges relating to the collapse of his property empire in 2007

Michael Lynne: being held in a prison in the city of Recife. Photograph:  Garrett White/Collins

Michael Lynne: being held in a prison in the city of Recife. Photograph: Garrett White/Collins

 

Brazil’s supreme court has cleared the way for the extradition of fugitive former solicitor Michael Lynn back to Ireland to face charges relating to the collapse of his property empire in 2007.

The ruling, by a panel of four of the court’s judges, comes with several conditions attached but the unanimous verdict signals the beginning of the end of a seven-year game of legal cat and mouse between Irish authorities and the Crossmolina, Co Mayo, lawyer.

Mr Lynn was not in the Brasília court for yesterday’s hearing. He is being held in a prison in the city of Recife where he was arrested in August of last year. In his absence, his defence team mounted a last stand against the extradition request.

Auditorium

They listened attentively as she denounced alleged errors in the extradition paperwork and accused Irish politicians and judges of a political persecution that had turned her client into a scapegoat for the crash of the celtic tiger.

But it was all in vain.

After she had finished, presiding judge Marco Aurélio quickly made clear he accepted the case quietly delivered in favour of extradition by Antenor Pereira Madruga Filho, the local legal heavy-hitter hired by the Irish Government to help guide the case through Brazil’s complex bureaucracy in the absence of an extradition treaty.

Mr Aurélio ordered that Brazil seek from the Irish a commitment only to charge Mr Lynn with theft from those among the 33 charges prepared by the Director of Public Prosecutions. He and his colleagues stipulated all time Mr Lynn spent in Brazilian detention be discounted from any future jail sentence.

Clarification

Consulting afterwards with Brian Glynn, the Irish Ambassador to Brazil, Mr Pereira Madruga Filho indicated Mr Lynn would not be returning immediately. He expected that by January several years of legal and diplomatic work in Dublin and Brasília would see him home.