Litter prosecutions: Legal cases by local authorities

Details on how many cases taken, fines collected - and for what offences

The most common reasons for fines being issued by Fingal County Council was litter being thrown in a public place, litter from a vehicle being put in a public place, and the putting up of posters and flyers that could be seen from a public place. File photograph: Getty Images

The most common reasons for fines being issued by Fingal County Council was litter being thrown in a public place, litter from a vehicle being put in a public place, and the putting up of posters and flyers that could be seen from a public place. File photograph: Getty Images

 

There are no national figures available on litter prosecutions, according to the Department of Communications, Climate Action and Environment. The figures below give examples for a number of local authorities.

Fingal County Council

In 2015 the council issued 853 litter fines and took 157 prosecutions. It does not have figures on how many prosecutions were successful.

It collected approximately €65,000 in fines. This year it has issued 651 fines to date, and taken 188 prosecutions.

It has collected approximately €63,000 in fines.

The most common reasons for fines being issued was litter being thrown in a public place, litter from a vehicle being put in a public place, and the putting up of posters and flyers that could be seen from a public place.

Dublin City Council

So far this year the council has achieved 73 prosecutions for littering offences.

The bulk, 49, were for illegal dumping, offences involving a vehicle, (10), postering offences (9), dog fouling (4) and skips creating litter (1) also featuring. The evidence for the vehicle related offences usually involved CCTV evidence.

Cork City Council

In 2015 the council issued 913 fines, of which 484 were paid. It won 54 prosecutions taken, and lost eight. This year it has issued 712 fines of which 320 have been paid, and it has won 41 prosecutions, and lost three.

The main type of case was illegal dumping. The council said there were a variety of reasons, including joint fines, appeals, and cases unsuitable for prosecution, that explain the difference between fines issued and fines paid.

Galway City Council

The council had one successful conviction for littering last year and has three cases due for hearing in December of this year. The conviction last year led to a fine of €400 and concerned a large amount of waste at the back of a house that was visible from the street.

A spokesman said the council is careful about sending cases to court in terms of wanting to ensure a prosecution is achieved, and is also mindful of the costs involved.

Dún Laoghaire–Rathdown County Council

The council secured seven convictions for littering in 2015 and the same number again to date in 2016.