Confusion over whether Twink’s home advertised as for sale

Court told ‘strong interest’ in house on which Start Mortgages says it is owed €250,000

Adele Condron-King  (Twink) was looking for an adjournment to allow sale of the property. File photograph: Frank Miller

Adele Condron-King (Twink) was looking for an adjournment to allow sale of the property. File photograph: Frank Miller

 

There was confusion in the Circuit Civil Court on Friday as to whether or not Twink’s debt-ridden home had been publicly advertised for sale.

Barrister Shaula Connaughton-Deeny, for Start Mortgages, said a search online on Thursday night by her instructing solicitors, Ivor Fitzpatrick & Co, had not shown the property being advertised for sale other than what she had read in a newspaper interview with Twink.

Solicitor Mark Doyle, for Adele Condron-King, aka Twink, said that according to a property agent, “there is a strong interest” in the sale of Idrone House, the property Ms Condron-King owns with estranged husband David Agnew.

Mr Doyle said his client Ms Condron-King was looking for an adjournment to allow sale of the property.

The bank issued possession proceedings against Ms Condron-King and Mr Agnew in relation to their former home at Idrone Avenue, Knocklyon, Dublin 16. The bank claimed it was owed about €250,000 including €18,000 in arrears.

The court heard that Mr Agnew, who was not present in court, was aware of the proceedings. Following difficulties in serving Mr Agnew with the legal proceedings Judge Jacqueline Linnane last year granted leave for him to be served at his place of work, the DIT Conservatory of Music and Drama, at 163 Rathmines Road, Dublin.

Judge Linnane on Firday said that from what she had read in Mr Doyle’s sworn statement, a sale was going to take place and she was satisfied the matter was being actively dealt with. She adjourned the proceedings to a date next year to facilitate sale of the property.

When the matter came before her last October, the judge had said that the matter had been ignored as it had been going on since 2010 and Ms Condron-King had made no payment on the mortgage during five years.

The judge had said Ms Condron-King had to address the arrears and had to decide the seriousness of the proceedings. She said the bank had made numerous efforts to address the matter.

In a recent interview, Ms Condron-King had told of her “heartbreak” in selling Idrone House. She said a loan had been contracted with the bank to restore the property but difficulties to repay it arose after an “expensive divorce” and a reduced income following an injury.