Our Wedding Story: Bagpipes and tartan at the Botanic Gardens

Glasnevin gets a dash of 1950s glamour on Emily Arthur and Ross Clark’s big day

 

Each Saturday on irishtimes.com/weddings we'll report on couples’ love stories. We'll tell the tales and show the pictures of these fabulous weddings, large or small, simple or extravagant, in Ireland and abroad. Click here to read more stories

Emily Arthurs (33), a doctor from Glasnevin in Dublin met civil servant Ross Clark (33), from Scotland, in 2012 at a mutual friend’s 30th birthday party on Edinburgh’s Royal Mile and they have been together ever since.

Emily has lived in Scotland for almost 10 years, having moved there to study at the University of Aberdeen.

Ross proposed at their home in Falkirk on January 3rd, 2014, and they were married on April 6th, 2015, Easter Monday, at Church of Our Lady of Dolours, Glasnevin.

After the ceremony, Andrew Munro – a Clark family friend – piped everyone along Botanic Road to the gates of the National Botanic Gardens were photos were taken.

Eighty guests, including the bride’s uncle Peter and his wife Gillian who flew from Boston and Ross’ aunt Lynne from Cape Town, climbed aboard a white double-decker wedding bus organised by Emily’s uncle, Vincent Doran, a Dublin Bus driver, which took everyone to the reception at the Cliff Town House in Dublin city.

Ross wore traditional Highland dress, including a Clark family tartan kilt, made to measure by Kiltpin in Falkirk. Emily wore an off-white 1950s-style dress, which she bought in Emma Roy in Edinburgh.

The bridesmaids were Emily’s cousin Kate Arthurs and friend Ciara Sotscheck. Ross’s brother Kenny was the best man.

Emily’s parents are Hugh and Mary Arthurs and Ross’s parents are Alan and Carol Clark, from Falkirk.

Photographs: John Burke, johnburkephotography.ie

We’d love to hear your wedding story. If you’d like to share it with our readers email weddings@irishtimes.com with a photograph and a little information about your big day

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