Fortress-like living on huge Rathfarnham site for €4m

This modernist home on the edge of Dublin is part of Ireland’s architectural history

  • Address: Bauhaus, 16 Stocking Lane, Rathfarnham, Dublin 16
  • Price: € 4,000,000
  • Agent: Coldwell Banker
This article is 5 months old
 

Set on 3.5ac of land on the southwestern fringes of Dublin, Bauhaus, at 16 Stocking Lane in Rathfarnham, is one of a kind. The fortress-like home, which was originally named Newhouse, was designed in the early 1960s by the husband-and-wife architectural team of Joachim and Margot Schürmann for Joachim’s brother and sister-in-law, the sculptors Werner Schürmann and Gerda Froemel.

Its exterior, built using kiln-reject red clay bricks – which cost a fraction of the standard price – exploits Bauhaus principles, using the fewest materials and avoiding any extraneous details.

The house also channels a far earlier form of architecture: the domus, or atrium house, of ancient Rome, which was designed to look inwards. The property’s rooms are set around a courtyard that is itself framed by an open colonnade of timber telegraph poles set on stone pads. The courtyard covers a substantial 111sq m (1,195sq ft) – big enough to accommodate a three-bedroom semi-detached house.

Instead of requiring guttering and downpipes, the property’s sloping roof and corner gargoyles funnel rainwater into the centre of this open space, making a feature of a regular part of Irish weather. When it pours the rain cascades down.

Bauhaus, Stocking Lane, Dublin 16
Bauhaus, Stocking Lane, Dublin 16
Bauhaus, Stocking Lane, Dublin 16
Bauhaus, Stocking Lane, Dublin 16
Bauhaus, Stocking Lane, Dublin 16
Bauhaus, Stocking Lane, Dublin 16
Bauhaus, Stocking Lane, Dublin 16
Bauhaus, Stocking Lane, Dublin 16
Bauhaus, Stocking Lane, Dublin 16
Bauhaus, Stocking Lane, Dublin 16

The rooms of the house, which extends to 232sq m (2,497sq ft), are all open plan, every room opening to the external space via floor-to-ceiling sliding doors.

The livingroom, with honey-coloured timber boards and an open fire, is to the left of the entrance hall; the kitchen leads through to the dining area. The house has four bedrooms; the master bedroom is across the atrium from the other three doubles.

The house winds around the sloping site, beyond the stable courtyard where Schürmann had his bronze-casting foundry, so that, although it appears all to be on one level, it in fact winds down to Froemel’s studio, accessed from the courtyard, and to a self-contained one-bedroom apartment of about 83sq m (893sq ft), all set within the overall house.

Built in 1964, the property was sold in 2006. Although it was listed as a protected structure, changes were then made to upgrade the kitchens and bathrooms. Permission to retain these alterations was granted in 2009.

The Coldwell Banker agenc is seeking €4 million.