Dublin Marathon: How to avoid injury

The Irish Society of Chartered Physiotherapists will guide runners through post-race recovery.

The Irish Society of Chartered Physiotherapists will guide runners through post-race recovery.

 

Thousands of runners will be hitting the streets of the capital next Monday for the Airtricity Dublin Marathon.

The Irish Society of Chartered Physiotherapists (ISCP) will once again guide runners through a dynamic cool-down and provide advice on the best methods of post-race recovery in its marquee at the finish line.

Bláithín Brady, who will head up the team of physios at the finish line, says most acute pain and injury can be avoided by following these tips:


Before the race
Avoid hypothermia and keep warm by wearing the right clothes, both at the startline and finish. It’s the end of October so bring lots of layers.

Avoid cramps by drinking enough water and isotonic drinks.

Perform an adequate dynamic warm-up prior to the start – easy jogging, short strides, heel kicks, high knee running and trunk twists.

Foam rolling can also be beneficial for
enhancing performance and preventing injuries.

It is a great way to warm up muscles before activity. In order to get the most effective results, use the roller prior to stretching.

Blisters, sprained ankles and joint pain on the outside of the knee and/or in the hip, are three of the most
common and avoidable injuries sustained by marathon runners.

Make sure the runners you wear on the day are well broken-in, fit comfortably and laces are tied properly so that the runner is not loose against the foot.

Also, wear good socks and apply blister plasters on areas prone to blisters before the marathon.

Rub Vaseline on body areas that will
repetitively rub against your clothing and use “second-skin” plasters on feet to avoid blisters.


After the race

As uncomfortable as it may be, keep moving after you cross the finish line.

Walk for five to 10 minutes and then come along to our ISCP marquee where we will take you through the appropriate cool-down including static stretches.

Soak your body in a cold bath, lake or ocean within a few hours of the race to aid decreasing inflammation.

Allow sufficient time for your body to rest before returning to training.

If you sustain a minor injury, follow the Price Protocol – protect, rest, ice, compress and elevate.

For more serious injuries, seek medical attention.

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