This warm, spicy stew can be rustled up in 15 minutes

Lilly Higgins: This winter stew is incredibly economical and can be made using store cupboard ingredients

Make this peanut stew as spicy as you like.

Make this peanut stew as spicy as you like.

 

I always turn to stews this time of year. Freezing temperatures require one big pot of warming nourishment. This year, though, my usual spring greens stew has taken on a new twist. I’ve based this dish on a gorgeous recipe for black-eyed beans or kunde in Swahili.

The beans are cooked in a peanut-tomato sauce often seen in African recipes. This creamy peanut sauce is used in soups or stews and can have chickpeas, beans, sweet potato and chopped dark, leafy greens. Mafe is a Senegalese version of this stew and is spicier with cayenne pepper.

Make this as spicy as you like. I love serving it with some White Mausu black bean rayu drizzled over the top. Kwanghi Chan now has his own range of ChanChan rayus ranging from black garlic to fiery mala peanut chilli, available through Sheridans Cheesemongers.

I’ve folded some kale through mine and served it with sauteed spinach. It’s so simple and real comfort food. Incredibly economical and based on store cupboard ingredients, this handy stew can be rustled up in fifteen minutes. I love it with short-grain brown rice or barley.

I often fold leftover roast chicken through it for my kids. It’s vegan as is though and perfectly balanced.

Ethiopian spice

I rely a lot on a good berbere spice mix. I find I add it to everything once it’s in my cupboard. It’s an Ethiopian blend of spices and can be assembled easily at home with the core ingredients being dried chillies, cardamom, cinnamon, coriander, ginger, cloves and nigella seeds. A balance of warmth and spice.

There are plenty of recipes online or in great books such as Ethiopia by Yohanis Gebreyesus. He has countless recipes using teff, a fine grain, including delicious injera, the spongy fermented flatbread that features daily in Ethiopian cuisine. So many of the recipes are vegan and vegetarian too, a really lovely book.

The recipe for kunde that this is based on is from In Bibi’s Kitchen by Hawa Hassan. Bibi means “grandmother” in Swahili. It’s a lovely collection of recipes and stories of grandmothers from the eight African countries that touch the Indian Ocean. It includes so many recipes that I’ve wanted to make at home for so long. The ground chickpea stew, Shiro, being one of them. It’s one of my favourite dishes, thanks to Fizzy of Emye, an Ethiopian farmers’ market stall in Cork.

The stories in the book are the real treasure though – the stories behind the recipes, how they came about and who cooked them. Crossing generations, cultures and continents. All connected and brought together by sharing delicious food

Recipe: PEANUT STEW WITH GREENS

Irish Times
Food&Drink Club

Exclusive events, competitions, reviews & recipes Join now
The Irish Times Logo
Commenting on The Irish Times has changed. To comment you must now be an Irish Times subscriber.
SUBSCRIBE
GO BACK
Error Image
The account details entered are not currently associated with an Irish Times subscription. Please subscribe to sign in to comment.
Comment Sign In

Forgot password?
The Irish Times Logo
Thank you
You should receive instructions for resetting your password. When you have reset your password, you can Sign In.
The Irish Times Logo
Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.
Screen Name Selection

Hello

Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.

The Irish Times Logo
Commenting on The Irish Times has changed. To comment you must now be an Irish Times subscriber.
SUBSCRIBE
Forgot Password
Please enter your email address so we can send you a link to reset your password.

Sign In

Your Comments
We reserve the right to remove any content at any time from this Community, including without limitation if it violates the Community Standards. We ask that you report content that you in good faith believe violates the above rules by clicking the Flag link next to the offending comment or by filling out this form. New comments are only accepted for 3 days from the date of publication.