This autumn fall for salads made with grains

JP McMahon: Spelt with roasted vegetables and herbs will produce a filling alternative to leaves

Take a few yellow and green courgettes and chop them into evenly-sized pieces...

Take a few yellow and green courgettes and chop them into evenly-sized pieces...

 

Though the summer is over and the kids are back at school, September weather is usually hot enough to still have one last weekend barbecue. I’m just back from Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall’s River Cottage Festival in Devon, where I cooked in the fire pit (just a fancy name for loads of barbecues and a couple of spits for cooking lambs). I chose to cook shellfish and pair it with some seaweed and sea herbs. I’ve written before about barbecuing shellfish, so I won’t go into it again, save to say that it’s fantastic. Barbecued mussels are my favourite. Just put them directly in the barbecue and wait for them to open. 

What struck me about cooking at River Cottage was the amount of vegetables that were cooked on the barbecues. Of course, this is part of Hugh’s eat less meat agenda,which I wholeheartedly agree with (that’s not to say I didn’t try the barbecued whole lamb). What stood out most for me were the flame-grilled courgettes, charred gently on the grill, and aubergines that sat directly in the embers, blistering purple skin releasing tantalising aromas. 

While at River Cottage, I also had a beautiful dish of spelt, roasted vegetables and herbs and this got me thinking about autumnal salads that are made up of grains as opposed to leaves.

Here’s how to cook an autumn salad:

Take a few yellow and green courgettes and chop them into evenly-sized pieces. Place on a tray and season with oil and sea salt and whatever spices you fancy: paprika, fennel seeds and cracked black pepper would be my choice.

Roast them at 200 degrees Celsius until nicely cooked but not too soft. Cook some spelt (Dunany Farm produce Irish spelt) in simmering water until soft. Strain and fold in the roasted courgettes. Season with your choice of acidity (vinegar, lemon or lime). Tear or chop up and add loads of different herbs (mint, fennel, parsley and basil). Serve with some Velvet Cloud sheep’s yogurt.

The Irish Times Logo
Commenting on The Irish Times has changed. To comment you must now be an Irish Times subscriber.
SUBSCRIBE
GO BACK
Error Image
The account details entered are not currently associated with an Irish Times subscription. Please subscribe to sign in to comment.
Comment Sign In

Forgot password?
The Irish Times Logo
Thank you
You should receive instructions for resetting your password. When you have reset your password, you can Sign In.
The Irish Times Logo
Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.
Screen Name Selection

Hello

Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.

The Irish Times Logo
Commenting on The Irish Times has changed. To comment you must now be an Irish Times subscriber.
SUBSCRIBE
Forgot Password
Please enter your email address so we can send you a link to reset your password.

Sign In

Your Comments
We reserve the right to remove any content at any time from this Community, including without limitation if it violates the Community Standards. We ask that you report content that you in good faith believe violates the above rules by clicking the Flag link next to the offending comment or by filling out this form. New comments are only accepted for 3 days from the date of publication.