Revealed: The most requested takeaway order at Leinster House

Deliveroo shows it’s not just Donald Trump who sullies corridors of power with fast food

White House takeaway: Donald Trump with fast food he bought for visiting college footballers during the US government shutdown in January. Photograph: Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty

White House takeaway: Donald Trump with fast food he bought for visiting college footballers during the US government shutdown in January. Photograph: Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty

 

It’s not just Donald Trump who sullies the the corridors of power with the lingering aroma of Kentucky Fried Chicken. Ireland’s political honchos are also fond of a family-sized bucket or two, not to mention a burrito or three.

Deliveroo, the app-driven food-delivery service, has revealed that Leinster House tops a poll of five government buildings and departments that regularly order takeaway deliveries. And it’s not fillet steak and foie gras that are being ferried to their hallowed halls.

Burritos, specifically from Boojum on Kevin Street in Dublin, are the most popular order among politicians, civil servants and government workers. Not everyone bends to the party whip on the important matter of who makes the best burritos, though, with some sending out to farthest Rathmines for their fix from Little Ass Burrito Bar, which comes in at number eight on the list.

It’s not all bad news for the health – and waistlines – of the country’s decisionmakers, however, as the farm-to-shop salad bar Sprout & Co comes second on the most-ordered list.

The data doesn’t reveal which government building has the hotline to Sprout, but it’s a fair bet there’s a delivery path worn between its Baggot Street branch and the Department of the Taoiseach, on Merrion Street, in line with Leo Varadkar’s clean-living image.

Deliveroo: the delivery company says Burritos from Boojum on Kevin Street in Dublin are the most popular order among politicians, civil servants and government workers
Deliveroo: the delivery company says Burritos from Boojum on Kevin Street in Dublin are the most popular order among politicians, civil servants and government workers

In fact that building orders the least takeaway of the five listed, with Leinster House followed by Culture, Heritage and the Gaeltacht; Finance; and Public Expenditure and Reform. (What! It cost how much for a burrito? Time to make some changes around here.)

The Eddie Rocket’s City Diner on Dame Street is also a popular order with the politicos, serving up the third most ordered food for delivery, just ahead of the chicken chain Nando’s. Eatokyo in Temple Bar is where the country’s top brass send out to when only sushi will do.

In at number six is Leo Burdock in Christchurch – “Famous fish and chips since 1913”. Imagine eating those at your desk in Leinster House as the smell of haddock and malt vinegar seeps into the wood panelling.

Burgers also make it on to the list at number seven, with the American import Five Guys being the most ordered. The top 10 is completed by Camden Rotisserie and Sano Pizza. KFC is a regular order too, coming in at number 13.

Restaurants most ordered from

  1. Boojum, Kevin St
  2. Sprout & Co, Baggot St
  3. Eddie Rockets, Dame St
  4. Nando’s, Andrew St
  5. Eatokyo, Temple Bar
  6. Leo Burdocks, Christchurch
  7. Five Guys, Georges St
  8. Little Ass Burrito Bar, Rathmines
  9. Camden Rotisserie, Camden St
  10. Sano Pizza, Temple Bar
  11. Wagamama, Sth King St
  12. Boojum, Mespil Rd
  13. KFC, Westmoreland St
  14. Embassy Grill, Mespil Road
  15. Keshk Cafe, Mespil Rd
  16. Papa John’s, Westmoreland St
  17. Supermac’s, Westmoreland St

Gov buildings and Departments that order most

  1. Leinster House, Kildare St
  2. Dept of Culture, Heritage and the Gaeltacht, Kildare St
  3. Dept Finance, Government Buildings, Kildare St
  4. Dept of Public Expenditure and Reform, Government Buildings, Kildare St
  5. Dept of the Taoiseach, Government Buildings, Kildare St
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