Navan hospital coffee dock shut over rodent problem

Coffee outlet in Our Lady’s Hospital one of seven food outlets issued with closure order

A spokesperson for the HSE said pest control was treated very seriously by hospital management. Photograph: The Irish Times

A spokesperson for the HSE said pest control was treated very seriously by hospital management. Photograph: The Irish Times

 

The coffee dock in Our Lady’s Hospital, Navan, was one of seven premises issued with a closure order for food safety breaches in April, the Food Safety Authority of Ireland has said.

The coffee dock in the Co Meath hospital was closed because of a rodent problem on April 1st and reopened on April 4th.

Concern about the potential for a rodent problem on the hospital grounds had been raised previously by a local councillor.

The HSE said the issue of pest control was treated very seriously by hospital management “and every effort is made to ensure premises are free from vermin and other pests and to ensure that measures are in place to control access points, particularly at ground floor level and particularly during maintenance and construction projects”.

The other six premises issued with closure orders in April were: Hartley’s Fish & Food in Tramore, where the closure order only related to an enclosed yard area at the rear; Star Pizza, 36 Denmark Street, Limerick; Joe’s Family Butchers, Johnstown, Navan, Meath - the closure order only related to the mincing of meat in the premises; Mace/Duleek Service Station grocery store, Carranstown, Duleek, Co Meath; The premises occupied by Growing Enterprise Together Ltd at Jim O’Donnell’s Yard, Dock Road, Limerick; and Polski Sklep Miesny shop, 50 South Street, New Ross, Co Wexford, where the closure related to the handling and cutting of raw meat and raw meat products.

Closure orders are served where it is deemed that there is, or is likely to be, a grave and immediate danger to public health at the premises.

Meanwhile, a prohibition order was served on Shellfish De La Mer, a fish processing company at Dinish Island, Castletownbere, Cork which resulted in the withdrawal of scallops.

A prohibition order is issued if there is likely to be a serious risk to public health from a particular product, class, batch or item of food.

Dr Bernard Hegarty, director of service contracts at the Food Safety Authority of Ireland said food businesses must be vigilant at all times in relation to food safety.

“Food safety must be paramount. Time and time again, there are instances where food businesses are potentially putting their customers’ health at risk by not complying with their legal obligations for food safety and hygiene,” he said. “Food businesses must recognise that the legal onus is on them to make sure that the food they serve is safe to eat.”