Six of the best films to see at the cinema this weekend

New this week: Casting rather than cash is king in Getty kidnapping saga, while Ben Stiller wrestles with his big ego in Brad’s Status

The official trailer for Brad's Status, starring Ben Stiller. Video: Amazon Studios

 

ALL THE MONEY IN THE WORLD ★★★★
Directed by Ridley Scott. Starring Michelle Williams, Christopher Plummer, Mark Wahlberg, Charlie Plummer, Romain Duris. 15A cert, general release, 132 min

Yes, this is the film that, after those disturbing revelations, caused Christopher Plummer to be swapped for Kevin Spacey in the role of billionaire John Paul Getty. It’s worth seeing for that performance and to appreciate the efficiency of the exchange. All the Money in the World, detailing the 1973 kidnapping of Getty’s grandson (the fine, unrelated Charlie Plummer), also happens to be Scott’s best film in a decade. Stylish, gripping and sound on the corrupting effects of wealth. DC

BRAD’S STATUS ★★★
Directed by Mike White. Starring Ben Stiller, Austin Abrams, Michael Sheen, Jenna Fischer, Luke Wilson, Jemaine Clement. 15A cert, limited release, 102 min
 

Brad’s Status casts the Zoolander star as the head of a nonprofit organisation who has lately begun to obsess over wealth, privilege and perceived inadequacies. At one point Stiller’s Brad has a breakdown when, mid-whine, his son’s friend calls him out on what she rightly identifies as “white privilege, male privilege, first-class problems”. Stiller and writer-director White have visited this territory before, but never with such grating effectiveness.Review TB

HUMAN FLOW ★★★★
Directed by Ai Weiwei. Club, QFT, Belfast, 140 min

Shot in 23 countries over more than a year, the new magnificent, macrocosmic film from plucky Chinese dissident Ai Weiwei is as epic as cinema gets. An incredible chronicle of the 65 million people who are currently displaced around the world, Human Flow provides an essential visual guide to the near incomprehensible scale of the current migrant crisis. Review TB

HOSTILES ★★★★
Directed by Scott Cooper. Starring Christian Bale, Rosamund Pike, Wes Studi, Jesse Plemons, Adam Beach, Rory Cochrane, Peter Mullan, Scott Wilson, Timothée Chalamet. 15A cert, general release, 133 min

Powerful, gritty western featuring Bale as an army captain reluctantly accompanying an old Comanche enemy (Studi) across dangerous territory. Studi and Bale play gently off each other’s hard carapaces to satisfying effect. But the standout performance comes from Pike. Convincingly American, the English actor edges her character from scooped-out despair to a kind of weary acceptance. The music is insidiously effective and the big skies work great magic. A satisfactory variation on The Searchers template. DC

MOLLY’S GAME ★★★
Directed by Aaron Sorkin. Starring Jessica Chastain, Idris Elba, Michael Cera, Kevin Costner, Chris O’Dowd. 15A cert, general release, 140 min

The flop lays out a true story. The deliciously named Molly Bloom (appropriately, it is Chris O’Dowd who eventually makes the Joycean connection) is a former competitive skier who went on to run high-stakes poker games in Los Angeles and New York. Much money came her way before she eventually attracted the attention of the law. Sorkin’s directorial debut makes good use of a suave cast, but his trademark showy dialogue is really straining for effect here. DC

PITCH PERFECT 3 ★★★
Directed by Trish Sie. Starring Anna Kendrick, Rebel Wilson, Brittany Snow, Hailee Steinfeld, Anna Camp, John Lithgow. 12A cert, general release, 93 min

The Divas are in a USO tour. The hugely entertaining third – don’t make it the last – episode in the world’s best a cappella franchise defies any graded assessment such as that attempted by the star rating above. Like an Abbot and Costello picture or a Road to . . . picture, Pitch Perfect 3 doesn’t make any effort at structure or coherence. Indeed, it turns its lack of interest in such things into a good self-regarding joke. Fair enough. There are worse things. Review DC

The Irish Times Logo
Commenting on The Irish Times has changed. To comment you must now be an Irish Times subscriber.
SUBSCRIBE
GO BACK
Error Image
The account details entered are not currently associated with an Irish Times subscription. Please subscribe to sign in to comment.
Comment Sign In

Forgot password?
The Irish Times Logo
Thank you
You should receive instructions for resetting your password. When you have reset your password, you can Sign In.
The Irish Times Logo
Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.
Screen Name Selection

Hello

Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.

The Irish Times Logo
Commenting on The Irish Times has changed. To comment you must now be an Irish Times subscriber.
SUBSCRIBE
Forgot Password
Please enter your email address so we can send you a link to reset your password.

Sign In

Your Comments
We reserve the right to remove any content at any time from this Community, including without limitation if it violates the Community Standards. We ask that you report content that you in good faith believe violates the above rules by clicking the Flag link next to the offending comment or by filling out this form. New comments are only accepted for 3 days from the date of publication.