The Crying Book: The tender connections between our tears

Review: Heather Christle’s book is a joyful exploration of why and how we cry

Christle calls herself out for her privilege as a white woman who is allowed to cry, whose weeping can in fact be weaponised, to bring ‘violence towards people of colour, and black people in particular’. Photograph: Getty

Christle calls herself out for her privilege as a white woman who is allowed to cry, whose weeping can in fact be weaponised, to bring ‘violence towards people of colour, and black people in particular’. Photograph: Getty

Early in Heather Christle’s book-length essay exploring the phenomenon of tears, the writer notes that she has “always preferred parallel lines to perpendicular ones”. She is considering this in light of a friend’s description of the notion of parallel crying, an act that comes alongside art but not precisely from it.

The phrase is something of a metaphor for the book itself, a text constructed alongside crying rather than precisely from it, a work of free association across themes and ideas that mimics the writer’s conclusions regarding our tears: “Maybe we do not cry about, but rather near or around.”

The Irish Times
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