Four steps to convince yourself that you’re worth a rise

Create a list of the things that make you unique and set you apart from others

Consult salary surveys on the internet to get a sense of what competitors are offering for your position. This will help you establish a lower and upper pay scale

Consult salary surveys on the internet to get a sense of what competitors are offering for your position. This will help you establish a lower and upper pay scale

 

Much has been written about how to negotiate a better salary. But what if you’re not sure you deserve a raise in the first place? Here are four steps toward acknowledging your self-worth and proving your value.

1 Develop a sense of urgency It may seem risky to ask for a raise. But the truth is that you may already be past the breaking point. If you’re feeling resentful and frustrated you have two options: stick with what you’re doing, knowing how deeply dissatisfying it is or step up and ask for a raise. Recognise that if you don’t take action your dissatisfaction may leak out through your words or deeds, and damage the reputation you’ve worked so hard to cultivate.

2 Boost your confidence with competitive research Consult salary surveys on the internet to get a sense of what competitors are offering for your position. This will help you establish a lower and upper pay scale

3 Get a complete picture Look at everything from your educational background to your long-term record within the organisation to your team’s performance in the past quarter. Most importantly, create a list of the things that make you unique and set you apart from others in your company. You can draw on anecdotes and hard data from past performance reviews, personal letters and commendations.

4 Prepare for pushback You’ll need to anticipate and prepare for potential objections and not let them rattle your confidence. If you encounter resistance regarding your data, focus the conversation on understanding how your compensation is set.

It may be useful to do some practice sessions with a coach or trusted colleague, to ensure that you can respond to objections without getting overheated and end the conversation on a positive note. – Copyright Harvard Business Review 2015

The Irish Times Logo
Commenting on The Irish Times has changed. To comment you must now be an Irish Times subscriber.
SUBSCRIBE
GO BACK
Error Image
The account details entered are not currently associated with an Irish Times subscription. Please subscribe to sign in to comment.
Comment Sign In

Forgot password?
The Irish Times Logo
Thank you
You should receive instructions for resetting your password. When you have reset your password, you can Sign In.
The Irish Times Logo
Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.
Screen Name Selection

Hello

Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.

The Irish Times Logo
Commenting on The Irish Times has changed. To comment you must now be an Irish Times subscriber.
SUBSCRIBE
Forgot Password
Please enter your email address so we can send you a link to reset your password.

Sign In

Your Comments
We reserve the right to remove any content at any time from this Community, including without limitation if it violates the Community Standards. We ask that you report content that you in good faith believe violates the above rules by clicking the Flag link next to the offending comment or by filling out this form. New comments are only accepted for 3 days from the date of publication.