Travel advice on . . . disruptive passengers

Do not take your freedom of flying for granted – blacklists do exist for disruptive flyers

Last summer Ryanair banned passengers from bringing alcohol on flights from the UK to Ibiza.

Last summer Ryanair banned passengers from bringing alcohol on flights from the UK to Ibiza.

 

Being able to fly wherever and whenever you want is a freedom that should never be taken for granted. People who behave in a disruptive or threatening way on board a flight risk having this freedom taken away.

Bad behaviour on flights has significantly increased in recent years. Alcohol and drugs are often involved. In 2014 there were 9,300 reported incidences of disruption to flights, up from 907 in 2008.

There are plenty of examples of incidents where passengers have been prosecuted for abusive and threatening behaviour. The most recent high-profile case in Ireland was that of singer Dolores O’Riordan.

Last summer Ryanair banned passengers from bringing alcohol on flights from the UK to Ibiza. Passengers were advised in advance that any alcohol purchases would have to be stowed in hold baggage. Anyone showing signs of anti-social behaviour would be denied travel without refund.

The International Civil Aviation Organisation and the International Air Transport Authority are working on the ratification of the Montreal Protocol 2014 (MP14) to enhance the Tokyo Convention on offences committed on aircraft.

It will widen jurisdiction of member states and enhance global aviation security provisions. MP14 should be in place by 2017/18 and will strengthen the zero tolerance for abusive behaviour policy of many airlines.

Blacklists do exist for disruptive passengers and airlines do share names though they will rarely confirm it. In February the five major Chinese airlines agreed to share details of unruly passengers.

Travelling can be a limited experience if you find yourself on one of those lists.

jscales@irishtimes.com

The Irish Times Logo
Commenting on The Irish Times has changed. To comment you must now be an Irish Times subscriber.
SUBSCRIBE
GO BACK
Error Image
The account details entered are not currently associated with an Irish Times subscription. Please subscribe to sign in to comment.
Comment Sign In

Forgot password?
The Irish Times Logo
Thank you
You should receive instructions for resetting your password. When you have reset your password, you can Sign In.
The Irish Times Logo
Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.
Screen Name Selection

Hello

Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.

The Irish Times Logo
Commenting on The Irish Times has changed. To comment you must now be an Irish Times subscriber.
SUBSCRIBE
Forgot Password
Please enter your email address so we can send you a link to reset your password.

Sign In

Your Comments
We reserve the right to remove any content at any time from this Community, including without limitation if it violates the Community Standards. We ask that you report content that you in good faith believe violates the above rules by clicking the Flag link next to the offending comment or by filling out this form. New comments are only accepted for 3 days from the date of publication.