Multinational law firm Hatstone to establish EU base in the Republic

Deal with Tully Rinckey’s Irish partners to facilitate a presence in Dublin

Accountants EY recently highlighted Dublin as the most popular destination for UK financial services businesses relocating in Brexit’s wake.

Accountants EY recently highlighted Dublin as the most popular destination for UK financial services businesses relocating in Brexit’s wake.

 

Multinational law firm Hatstone is establishing its EU base in the Republic through a deal with the partners of Tully Rinckey (Ireland).

Hatstone has offices in the British Virgin Islands, London, Jersey, Panama and South Africa. The firm specialises in finance, and corporate and commercial law.

Tully Rinckey’s Irish partners, led by Grainne Loughnane, with her colleagues, Setanta Landers and Julie O’Sullivan, their associates and staff, are joining Hatstone in a move that will allow it open an EU base in Dublin. The agreement ends their association with the Tully Rinckey international network of law firms.

Managing partner Grainne Loughnane will head Hatstone’s Dublin office. She said that the need for a post-Brexit base in the EU and the Investment Limited Partnerships (Amendment) Act, 2020, designed to make the Republic more attractive to private funds, lured the Hatstone here.

Ms Loughnane noted that she had worked alongside Hatstone lawyers for many years.

“As a result of our strong relationship and shared values, Hatstone is a natural fit for us,” she added.

Hatstone partner Bella Ward said “more and more” of the firm’s clients had been asking it to establish in the Republic as they sought invest here, or through here, or wanted a presence in the EU.

The firm’s newly-joined Irish partners have experience in advising investors, companies and financial institutions. They have a particular focus on property, including inward investment in social housing.

Ms Loughnane explained that this was a new area for the firm, but added that recent law reforms and policy changes left it well supported.

“We’re seeing a lot of interest in this sector from investors seeking to diversify away from more mature markets for these assets in the UK and Europe, ” she said.

Accountants EY recently highlighted Dublin as the most popular destination for UK financial services businesses relocating in Brexit’s wake.