Greyhound granted injunction to prevent councillor’s blockade

Company also seeks to restrain picketers from interfering with waste collection

Judge said the matter was a public health issue and was particularly serious. Photograph: David Sleator

Judge said the matter was a public health issue and was particularly serious. Photograph: David Sleator

 

Greyhound Recycling was yesterday granted an injunction restraining Dublin councillor Gino Kenny from blockading the company’s bin lorries collecting waste.

Barrister Louis McEntagart told the High Court that Greyhound was also seeking injunctions to restrain picketers from interfering with the company’s waste collection around the city.

He told Mr Justice Garrett Sheehan that more than 60 workers had been engaged in a dispute with the waste collection company over pay since June last.

Mr McEntagart said Greyhound’s solicitor had written to People Before Profit councillor Kenny requiring an undertaking that he would not engage in unlawful picketing.

He said Mr Kenny, who was not represented in court, had replied that he would continue supporting the “Greyhound lockout” as long as the company continued to use what he called “scab labour”.

In a video shown to the court, Mr Kenny could be seen obstructing a lorry trying to leave Greyhound premises in Clondalkin, in west Dublin, last month. Mr Kenny had later been arrested by gardaí.

Mr McEntagart told the judge Greyhound was worried about health and safety issues as the video also showed a child being placed in front of the lorry as part of the blockade action.

The judge also made an order restraining Kenny from acting in a threatening and/or intimidating manner towards employees seeking to enter or leave Greyhound’s premises and its waste collectors.

The judge adjourned similar applications to be made by Greyhound against Dublin South Central TD Joan Collins and local councillors Patrick Dunne and Tina Mac Veigh.

The judge heard Ms Collins was on holiday in France and there was a doubt as to whether Ms Mac Veigh, who was also on holiday, was aware of the proceedings.

Mr Dunne’s solicitor told the court his client was willing to give an undertaking that he would not impede bin lorries.

Mr McEntagart said there was urgency in the case as the company could not collect waste properly.

The judge said the matter was a public health issue and was particularly serious. He adjourned all outstanding matters until next Thursday.