Kath Viner appointed editor-in-chief of ‘The Guardian’

Former deputy editor and chief of company’s US operation will be first woman to edit paper

The Guardian has appointed Kath Viner as its new editor, the first woman to hold the post in the paper’s almost 200-year history. Photograph: The Guardian.

The Guardian has appointed Kath Viner as its new editor, the first woman to hold the post in the paper’s almost 200-year history. Photograph: The Guardian.

 

Katharine Viner has been appointed the editor-in-chief of the Guardian, the first woman to run the newspaper in its 194-year history.

Ms Viner, currently deputy editor of the Guardian and editor-in-chief of Guardian US, will take up the role in the summer from incumbent Alan Rusbridger, who is to stand down after 20 years.

The Scott Trust, the ultimate owner of the Guardian which safeguards the title’s editorial future and independence, made the announcement yesterday after members of the board conducted final interviews with two shortlisted candidates. She will be the 12th editor since the paper was founded in May 1821.

Ms Viner won the support of Guardian and Observer staff in an indicative ballot earlier this month. Fifty-three per cent of those who voted backed her with a first-choice vote of 438 in the single transferable vote system used for the ballot. She said: “Being editor-in-chief of the Guardian and Observer is an enormous privilege and responsibility, leading a first-class team of journalists revered around the world for outstanding reporting, independent thinking, incisive analysis and digital innovation.”

Challenging

Ms Viner will be the only woman at the top of a daily quality title in the UK. She joins a small group of women editing leading British newspapers: Lisa Markwell, editor of the Independent on Sunday, Victoria Newton, the editor of the Sun on Sunday, Sarah Sands at the Evening Standard and Dawn Neesom at the Star. – (Guardian service)