CIF warns vital transport, water and flood schemes on hold

Construction Industry Federation calls on Government to intensify long-term investment

Working on the new Luas line in Dublin: various other projects face indefinite delays because of constraints on the Government’s capital programme, says the CIF

Working on the new Luas line in Dublin: various other projects face indefinite delays because of constraints on the Government’s capital programme, says the CIF

 

Key transport projects are at risk of indefinite delay due to constraints on the Government’s capital programme, construction industry leaders have warned.

The Construction Industry Federation (CIF) said a review of the top 100 transport, water and flood defence schemes shows many are stalled.

Calling on the Government to intensify long-term investment, it said it should increase capital spending on infrastructure from 2 per cent of GDP to 6-8 per cent in the next decade.

The review of projects by Construction Information Services found that many have already been delayed for up to four years. This included projects at Dublin Airport, and waterworks and roadwork improvements. The review also assessed flood defences projects for towns along the Shannon.

“In the coming months, we’re hoping to engage with Government to develop alternative sources of funding for infrastructure,” said Tom Parlon, director general of the CIF.

“We hope to set out with Government a strategy outlining how our civil engineering, contractors and house-building members can contribute to addressing Ireland’s infrastructure deficit in an ambitious programme.”

About 60 per cent of the projects in question were costed, with the combined value reaching €6 billion.

“This is a significant proportion of the Government’s €27 billion public capital programme. Considering that there is only a €10 billion allocation for transport, the CIF believes that a number of these essential projects are at risk of being delayed indefinitely.

“The negative impacts on job creation, balanced regional development and the attraction of foreign direct investment to Cork, Limerick and Waterford will transform the two-tier recovery into a permanent two-tier economy.”

The review examined projects in these areas: roads, road improvement and upgrades, bridges, Metro North, runways, railway stations, airport and port projects, water and wastewater treatment, sewerage works, water mains and drainage projects, sea protection and river works against flooding.

“Infrastructure investment is now, by omission, profoundly shaping Irish society,” Mr Parlon said.

“In everyday terms, this manifests itself in housing shortages, decrepit road networks, unsafe water infrastructure, and a lack of broadband, particularly in the regions.”