Dublin rises 10 places in Mercer cost-of-living survey

Most western European cities climb in annual rankings

The IFSC. Although the cost of living in Dublin rose this year, it is still relatively cheaper than it was at the height of the boom – in 2007, Dublin was judged to be the 16th most expensive city in the world by Mercer. Photograph: Bryan O’Brien

The IFSC. Although the cost of living in Dublin rose this year, it is still relatively cheaper than it was at the height of the boom – in 2007, Dublin was judged to be the 16th most expensive city in the world by Mercer. Photograph: Bryan O’Brien

 

Dublin has moved up 10 places in Mercer’s annual cost-of-living survey for expatriate employees. The city is 51st in the consultancy firm’s rankings, designed to help multinational companies and governments allow for differences in the cost of living when setting pay levels.

Although the Irish capital rose this year, it is still relatively cheaper than it was at the height of the boom – in 2007, Dublin was judged to be the 16th most expensive city in the world by Mercer.

In this year’s survey, London was ranked the most expensive UK city for expatriate workers, coming 12th overall. Belfast was in 120th position in the list of 211 cities, up 38 places.

Asian and European cities continue to dominate the rankings as the costliest cities for expatriates, with Hong Kong in third place, followed by Singapore.

Four European cities remain in the 10 most expensive. Zurich is the priciest, in fifth place, followed by Geneva in sixth and Bern in eighth.

The world’s most expensive city is Luanda in Angola.