Global exposure from World Cup could boost Moy Park if it floats

Parent company said a partial floatation on cards for Armagh-based poultry producer

Moy Park is best-known in Ireland for selling fresh meats under its own name as well as under brands including Jamie Oliver. Photograph: Alan Betson / THE IRISH TIMES

Moy Park is best-known in Ireland for selling fresh meats under its own name as well as under brands including Jamie Oliver. Photograph: Alan Betson / THE IRISH TIMES

 

Irish poultry company Moy Park is set for global exposure this summer as one of the sponsors of the 2014 FIFA World Cup in Brazil.

The sponsorship deal has been set up by Brazilian parent company Marfrig and will see the Moy Park brand beamed to hundreds of millions of viewers across the globe on pitch perimeter boards during matches.

Football’s World Cup is among the most watched sporting events on the planet and the global exposure could come in handy, as a partial flotation is potentially on the cards for the Armagh-based food processing group this year.

Marfrig recently said it was examining selling stakes in Moy Park and US-based Keystone Foods so that it could pay down debt.The group has hired banks to advise on a possible sale.

Marfrig has estimated that it would reduce net debt to 2.7 times earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortisation by the end of 2015 by selling 25 per cent to 30 per cent stakes in Moy Park and Keystone.

Moy Park is best-known in Ireland for selling fresh meats under its own name as well as under brands including Jamie Oliver. The business also contributed some €1.5 billion to the Marfrig’s group sales last year.

Marfrig recently announced the appointment of Vincent Gaillard as global co-ordinator of its 2014 World Cup activities.

He previously managed Coca-Cola’s activities at the 1998, 2002 and 2006 World Cup tournaments as well as at the Beijing and London Olympics.

The Irish Times Logo
Commenting on The Irish Times has changed. To comment you must now be an Irish Times subscriber.
SUBSCRIBE
GO BACK
Error Image
The account details entered are not currently associated with an Irish Times subscription. Please subscribe to sign in to comment.
Comment Sign In

Forgot password?
The Irish Times Logo
Thank you
You should receive instructions for resetting your password. When you have reset your password, you can Sign In.
The Irish Times Logo
Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.
Screen Name Selection

Hello

Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.

The Irish Times Logo
Commenting on The Irish Times has changed. To comment you must now be an Irish Times subscriber.
SUBSCRIBE
Forgot Password
Please enter your email address so we can send you a link to reset your password.

Sign In

Your Comments
We reserve the right to remove any content at any time from this Community, including without limitation if it violates the Community Standards. We ask that you report content that you in good faith believe violates the above rules by clicking the Flag link next to the offending comment or by filling out this form. New comments are only accepted for 3 days from the date of publication.