Philip Browne to leave role as chief executive of IRFU

Browne has held the role since 1998 and had planned to retire earlier before pandemic

IRFU CEO Philip Browne will step down at the end of the year. Photo: Ryan Byrne/Inpho

IRFU CEO Philip Browne will step down at the end of the year. Photo: Ryan Byrne/Inpho

 

Philip Browne will retire as chief executive of the Irish Rugby Football Union (IRFU) at the end of the year.

Browne has held the role of chief executive for 23 years since 1998 and will step aside on December 31st.

Chief operating officer Kevin Potts will assume the role as interim chief executive while the organisation undertake a recruitment process.

Browne was due to step aside when he turned 60 but delayed the move after the Covid-19 pandemic struck, causing a severe financial impact for the IRFU. He may continue in part-time roles in the future but, as yet, has not made any decisions.

“It has long been my intention to retire from the role of Chief Executive to coincide with reaching the age of 60,” Browne said in a statement released by the IRFU.

“I delayed my decision, given the recent extraordinary pressures on Irish rugby, as a result of the Covid Pandemic. I now believe we are at a point where it is possible to commence plotting a sustainable route out of the pandemic and engage in a structured approach to future longer-term planning, hence the announcement of my decision at this time.

“It has been a privilege to serve as Chief Executive and while undoubtedly it has been a pressurised and challenging role it has, in equal measure, been a truly exciting and rewarding career.

“I would like to thank the various Union committees with whom I have worked and the staff of the Union for their unwavering support as, together, we oversaw the constant changes required to ensure the Union remained relevant to its constituents and the world game.

“I intend, in time, to reflect on possible future part-time commitments but, as of now, have no definite plans.”

The Irish Times Logo
Commenting on The Irish Times has changed. To comment you must now be an Irish Times subscriber.
SUBSCRIBE
GO BACK
Error Image
The account details entered are not currently associated with an Irish Times subscription. Please subscribe to sign in to comment.
Comment Sign In

Forgot password?
The Irish Times Logo
Thank you
You should receive instructions for resetting your password. When you have reset your password, you can Sign In.
The Irish Times Logo
Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.
Screen Name Selection

Hello

Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.

The Irish Times Logo
Commenting on The Irish Times has changed. To comment you must now be an Irish Times subscriber.
SUBSCRIBE
Forgot Password
Please enter your email address so we can send you a link to reset your password.

Sign In

Your Comments
We reserve the right to remove any content at any time from this Community, including without limitation if it violates the Community Standards. We ask that you report content that you in good faith believe violates the above rules by clicking the Flag link next to the offending comment or by filling out this form. New comments are only accepted for 3 days from the date of publication.