Robbie McNamara’s encouragement for paralysed Freddy Tylicki

GoFundMe page set up to help raise funds for German-born former champion apprentice jockey

Jockey Frederik Tylicki: paralysed in the lower half of his body following his recent fall at Kempton. Photograph: Mike Egerton/PA Wire.

Jockey Frederik Tylicki: paralysed in the lower half of his body following his recent fall at Kempton. Photograph: Mike Egerton/PA Wire.

 

Robbie McNamara had some words of encouragement for Freddy Tylicki as the jockey comes to terms with being paralysed in the lower half of his body.

Tylicki has been told by doctors he has a T7 paralysis, meaning he has movement in the upper half of his body but not the lower, after he sustained spinal injuries in a fall at Kempton last Monday.

McNamara’s riding career was brought to a premature end when he suffered severe spinal injuries in a fall at Wexford in April 2015 that left him with no movement from the waist down.

“It’s a big adjustment to life, especially when you’re such an active person,” said McNamara.

“He [Tylicki] will have been riding every day and it just stops completely.

“He’ll be busy in hospital with rehab and he needs to find something else in life.

“It will take a bit of adjusting, but he’ll live a perfectly normal life after.”

McNamara took out a training licence earlier this year and enjoyed a dream start to his career when saddling a double at Cork in July.

He said: “I’m probably happier now than I was before I got the fall. I’m not sitting in the sauna for five days a week and pulling my hair out.

“I have the same friends I always had, live in the same place, doing the same things.

“I was skydiving last week and I’m living a perfectly normal life.

“Some things can be a bit more awkward than others, but it won’t stop him from doing anything.”

A GoFundMe page, set up on Friday evening by At The Races presenter Matt Chapman, is on the way to raising GBP£200,000 for Tylicki.

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