Suzann Pettersen recovers to sit one shot off Turnberry lead

South Korea’s Jin Young Ko and Taiwan’s Teresa Lu lead British Open after third round

Suzann Pettersen of Norway plays her second shot at the par-five 17th hole during the third round of the Women’s British Open on the Ailsa Course at Turnberry. Photograph: David Cannon/Getty Images

Suzann Pettersen of Norway plays her second shot at the par-five 17th hole during the third round of the Women’s British Open on the Ailsa Course at Turnberry. Photograph: David Cannon/Getty Images

 

Norway’s Suzann Pettersen recovered from a poor start to her third round to remain firmly in contention for a third Major title in the Ricoh Women’s British Open.

Pettersen’s two-shot halfway lead quickly disappeared as she dropped shots on the first and sixth in testing conditions at Turnberry, but the 34-year-old bounced back with birdies on the 10th and 11th on her way to a level-par 72.

That left the Solheim Cup star on seven under par, one shot behind South Korea’s Jin Young Ko and Taiwan’s Teresa Lu, who both shot rounds of 69.

Japan’s Mika Miyazato carded a 70 to lie two shots off the lead with world number one Inbee Park, world number two Lydia Ko and Australia’s Minjee Lee all on five under.

England’s Melissa Reid carded a double bogey on the first and was four over for the day after six holes, but produced a superb fightback with six birdies and an eagle to record a 69 and finish four under.

That was one shot ahead of Wales’s Amy Boulden, whose 68 contained five birdies and just one bogey and was the lowest round of the day.

Reid hopes she can put up a real challenge for the title on the final day of the tournament.

“I’m not too far off. If I can just sort out the first few holes where I’ve been dropping shots then I’ve certainly got a chance,” said the 27-year-old from Derby.

“I feel like I’m putting really well and my swing feels good so I’m going to go out there tomorrow and give it my best shot.”

Boulden, meanwhile, hopes her upbringing in Conwy will play to her advantage at Turnberry.

“Growing up at Conwy, definitely you get used to the wind and links golf,” she said. “Especially playing as an amateur, we grew up playing links golf.

“In the British Open, you want it to blow, you want it to be tough conditions. You don’t want the top players going out and shooting seven under, you want to grind it out and that’s an advantage for me.”

The Irish Times Logo
Commenting on The Irish Times has changed. To comment you must now be an Irish Times subscriber.
SUBSCRIBE
GO BACK
Error Image
The account details entered are not currently associated with an Irish Times subscription. Please subscribe to sign in to comment.
Comment Sign In

Forgot password?
The Irish Times Logo
Thank you
You should receive instructions for resetting your password. When you have reset your password, you can Sign In.
The Irish Times Logo
Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.
Screen Name Selection

Hello

Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.

The Irish Times Logo
Commenting on The Irish Times has changed. To comment you must now be an Irish Times subscriber.
SUBSCRIBE
Forgot Password
Please enter your email address so we can send you a link to reset your password.

Sign In

Your Comments
We reserve the right to remove any content at any time from this Community, including without limitation if it violates the Community Standards. We ask that you report content that you in good faith believe violates the above rules by clicking the Flag link next to the offending comment or by filling out this form. New comments are only accepted for 3 days from the date of publication.