Robert Allenby says he was attacked and robbed in Hawaii

Australian golfer left with facial injuries after he was kidnapped and dumped in a park

Australian golfer Robert Allenby, seen here playing in the first round of the   Sony Open in Hawaii, says he was was kidnapped, beaten, robbed and dumped in a park in Honolulu on Friday night.  Photograph: Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images

Australian golfer Robert Allenby, seen here playing in the first round of the Sony Open in Hawaii, says he was was kidnapped, beaten, robbed and dumped in a park in Honolulu on Friday night. Photograph: Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images

 

Australian golfer Robert Allenby was left with facial injuries after he said he was kidnapped, beaten, robbed and dumped in a park in Honolulu on Friday night.

Allenby, 43, was in Hawaii to compete in the Sony Open at the Waialae Country Club in Honolulu, but missed the cut and was planning to fly home on Saturday, the Golf Channel reported on its website.

But on Friday night, while at the Amuse Wine Bar in Waikiki with his caddie and a friend, Allenby said he was taken from the bar and robbed of his wallet, phone, cash and credit cards before waking up groggy in a park about 10 kilometres away.

“I’m just glad to be alive,” Allenby told Reuters by telephone. “I’m still in a bit of shock. I’ve been checked out by a doctor, and I should be okay.

“I was separated from my friend in the bar after we had paid the tab,” Allenby recounted. “Next thing you know, I’m being dumped in a park miles away. A homeless woman found me and told me she saw a few guys pull up and throw me out of a car.”

Allenby said he had no recollection of what had happened and that he was discovered outside the park by a man he described as “a retired military guy” who paid for a taxi back to his hotel.

“I called police from there,” Allenby said.

According to the Golf Channel, police are reviewing surveillance footage from the bar to try to identify a suspect.

Attempts by Reuters to reach Honolulu police on Saturday were not immediately successful.

Allenby missed the cut at this week’s Sony Open after shooting successive rounds of one-over-par 71 at Waialae.

Defending champion Jimmy Walker seized control of the event with a third-round 62 that gave him a two-stroke advantage and a shot at redemption at the Waialae Country Club.

Walker blew a golden chance of capturing last week’s Hyundai Tournament of Champions in neighbouring Kapalua, where he led eventual winner Patrick Reed by four strokes with four holes to play before losing in a play-off.

One week later and Walker has positioned himself to defend his title after Saturday’s surge put him on 16 under for the tournament with four birdies on the front nine and six on the back offsetting a couple of bogeys.

“I was pretty bummed (about last week) but I got over it. You have to because you have to play the next day,” Walker told reporters. “It was nice not to have too many days in between tournaments.”

Second round co-leader Matt Kuchar is two strokes off the lead at 14 under following a two-under 68 and will lead a host of challengers snapping at Walker’s heels in Sunday’s final round.

Americans Brian Harman and Troy Merritt are at 13 under, while South African Tim Clark and 21-year-old Justin Thomas sit another shot further back.

Thomas was the story of the tournament in the second round where he blitzed the field for a course record-tying 61. However, in the follow up, the unsung youngster struggled with swing issues and could only manage an even-par 70.

Walker used a red-hot putter to nose in front as he amazingly finished the day with 11 straight one-putts.

He has enjoyed quite the run in Hawaii, where he is a collective 54 under par in his last 11 competitive rounds there.

“It’s awfully impressive what Jimmy has been doing. I’m looking forward to playing with him tomorrow and seeing if I can push him,” said Kuchar, who enjoyed a second-round 63 but was not quite as on form in round three.

“I just felt like I came up short on my putts all day.”

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