Golfgate – ‘Do they think we are fools?’

 

Sir, – I wonder did anyone actually leave the infamous dinner in Clifden. Is there even one who said, “Ah, c’mon. There’ s way too many people here. We should leave.” – Yours, etc,

ROBERT JORDAN,

Kilcullen,

Co Kildare.

Sir, – It is not unthinkable that a challenge to the constitutionality of laws resulting from the pandemic will be referred to the Supreme Court at some point during this national emergency. It is utterly unthinkable that Mr Justice Seamus Woulfe would hear that case. The most important resignation has yet to come. Every tick of the clock since the Clifden meal is eroding public confidence in what is a vital organ of our democratic state. – Yours, etc,

BRIAN HAYES,

Clonakilty,

Co Cork.

Sir, – Politics aside, the use of “fulsome” and “abject” in the context of those issuing apologies is surprising. “Fulsome” is dangerously ambiguous because it has connotations of being effusive, excessive or insincere. Abject also has negative interpretations, such as hopeless, servile or humiliating. It would be better to use “full” or “complete” in terms of an apology, if that is the intended meaning.

Whether the apology in itself would suffice or not is another matter. – Yours, etc,

BOB HUGHES,

Kilcloon,

Co Meath.

Sir, – Phil Hogan, the Minister for Education, the Taoiseach, and others, might do well to check the dictionary definition of “fulsome” before they next use the word. I would much prefer “genuine” or “sincere”. – Yours, etc,

DAVID NISBET,

Rathfarnham,

Dublin 16.

Sir, – Phil Hogan has offered his “fulsome and profound” apology for attending the recent golf dinner in Clifden.

That’s impossible. An apology cannot be “fulsome” and “profound”. My guess is that it’s the former. – Yours, etc,

GODFREY SHAW,

Dublin 7.

Sir, – I note that the majority of comments from Phil Hogan regarding this controversy come from his spokesperson.

It would appear that he has lost his voice as well as his common sense. – Yours, etc,

FINNIAN E MATTHEWS,

Skerries,

Co Dublin.

Sir, – The leader of the Green Party thinks the Government needs to put the current controversy behind it! If this man cannot gauge the seething anger of the electorate over this matter, and the need for a lot more answers, then I suggest he would be better off cleaning out his Leinster House drawer now and cycling off into the sunset for good. – Yours, etc,

NORMAN LOWTHER,

Dublin 5.

Sir, – The Government slogan “We’re all in this together” was a lie. I feel betrayed, insulted and angry. Like many others, I have missed hospital appointments and treatments, family weddings, funerals, confirmations, first holy communions, birthdays, daily Mass, meeting friends and family, holidays and numerous hobbies. Like everyone else, I felt I was doing this for the common good and it was worth the effort. Now I feel cheated.

These are not just words written in anger. This is raw pain held back for six months because I thought “We are all in this together”. – Yours, etc,

ANNE McGRATH,

Rathfarnham.

Dublin 16.

Sir, – In the light of recent events, perhaps the Covid-19 slogan should be changed to “Some of us are all in this together.” – Yours, etc,

TONY BURKE,

Baldoyle,

Dublin 13.

Sir, – When appalling events, such as the Oireachtas Golf Society dinner, engulf the media and consume public discourse, we realise just how good we are at anger and outrage. I wonder how good we would be at forgiveness? – Yours, etc,

JOHN McHUGH,

Glenageary,

Co Dublin.

Sir, – So the Olympics could be postponed for a year due to the pandemic, but not the Oireachtas Golf Club dinner? – Yours, etc,

JOHN COVENEY,

Shankill,

Dublin 18.

Sir, – Do they think that we are fools? People have made so many personal sacrifices since March. – Yours, etc,

MAUREEN MOONEY,

Salthill,

Galway.

Sir, – Apart from that, lads, what was the food like? – Yours, etc,

OLIVER McGRANE,

Dublin 16.

Sir, – I am sick of all the bickering and point-scoring that is going on between the politicians. Why don’t they get on with the job they were elected to do, and run the country? There are more urgent and vitally important matters to be dealt with, affecting the future of us all. Restrained and adult behaviour will achieve more than squabbling and recrimination.

Remember, anyone can make a mistake! – Yours, etc,

VERELL BOOTH,

Shankill,

Co Dublin.

Sir, – Are we going to pull the house down just because we have a leak in the roof! – Yours, etc,

BRIGID CONNAUGHTON,

Mount Merrion,

Co Dublin.

Sir, – If only someone was there who had knowledge of the law. Oh wait. If only someone was there who could ask the hard questions. Oh wait. If only someone was there who had come from a country more ravaged by Covid-19 than Ireland. Oh wait. All that was missing was someone from the banks. Oh wait. – Yours, etc,

JOHN McKEOWN,

Waterford.