A new anthem for a new Ireland?

 

Sir, – Fintan O’ Toole has been pronouncing on many matters lately, such as the referendum, the demise of the Catholic Church, the “new” Ireland, and latterly the national anthem (Opinion & Analysis, June 5th).

It would be useful in future if at the end of his articles he would indicate to his “flock” whether or not he is speaking ex cathedra. – Yours, etc,

PETER McDONALD,

Delgany,

Co Wicklow.

Sir, – In the world according to Fintan O’Toole, does Ireland ever do anything right? – Yours, etc,

BRIAN GRAHAM,

Dublin 13.

Sir, – Why not put the IRFU in charge of the anthem? Look how proud it is of the one we have! – Yours, etc,

DAVID MURNANE,

Dunshaughlin,

Co Meath.

Sir, – While I would agree with much of what Fintan O’Toole has to say about the national anthem, I think he is taking the whole thing a bit too seriously.

National anthems are not really serious expressions of national identity or aspirations. They are more by way of being familiar comforting tunes in times of celebration and formal occasions.

A good example is Flower of Scotland. The attendance at Murrayfield, including members of the English royal family, will give full voice to telling us that they sent proud Edward’s army “homeward tae think again”. Furthermore, they vow that they will do the same thing again. They don’t really mean it. If they did they wouldn’t have voted against independence. – Yours, etc,

JIM CUNNINGHAM,

Swords,

Co Dublin.

Sir, – It would appear that Fintan O’Toole has become giddy with the increasingly rapid abolition of traditional sacred cows in the country and has now turned his sights on Amhrán na bhFiann for consignment to the scrapheap as part of the brave new world. I don’t detect a clamour in France for retiring La Marseillaise from national service although it possesses the similar disadvantage of being an equally objectionable ode to bloodthirsty militarism. – Yours, etc,

RAY McCARTHY,

Glasnevin,

Dublin 9.

Sir, – Amhrán na Fintan? – Yours, etc,

NIALL McARDLE,

Smithfield,

Dublin 7.