‘Trump Not Welcome’ protest group formed ahead of Irish visit

Organisers to hold co-ordinated demonstrations in Clare and Dublin for arrival of Republican candidate

Mercedes Vega and Katreeva woolf at a protest near where republican presidential candidate Donald Trump was speaking  at a rally in Fresno, California on May 27th, 2016. Photograph: Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty

Mercedes Vega and Katreeva woolf at a protest near where republican presidential candidate Donald Trump was speaking at a rally in Fresno, California on May 27th, 2016. Photograph: Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty

 

Coordinated protests in Clare and Dublin have been announced for Donald Trump’s arrival in Ireland later this month.

Organisers of the “Trump Not Welcome” group, formed on Tuesday, say they hope the demonstrations, if not seen by the presumptive Republican presidential nominee himself, will attract US media attention.

Mr Trump, who continues to exasperate with his comments in the run up to November’s election, is due to arrive at Shannon Airport on June 23rd and visit his Doonbeg golf resort in Co Clare before leaving on June 25th. His itinerary, however, has not been confirmed.

The “Trump Not Welcome” group is a coalition of political and interest groups including the Anti Austerity Alliance, People Before Profit, Green Party, United Against Racism and the Irish Anti War Movement.

Socialist TD and organiser Paul Murphy said it was hoped a visible protest would help bolster the cause of various US based campaigns around issues including immigrant rights, women and climate change.

“The big thing is that people in America will know about it,” he said.

“There will be a lot of American media coverage around his visit. I think the fact that the [IRISH]Government doesn’t feel they should roll out the red carpet like they did the last time [Mr Trump visited Ireland], and Enda Kenny’s remarks in the Dáil, are a sign they know he is not popular.”

Pressed in the Dáil last week about his reaction to Mr Trump’s comments on immigration and the Middle East, Mr Kenny said: “If Trump’s comments are racist and dangerous, which they are, there is an alternative to vote for.”

However, despite those remarks, Mr Trump’s staff have not ruled out his potentially meeting Mr Kenny during his high-profile visit.

The Dublin protest has been tentatively scheduled for 6pm on O’Connell Street on Thursday, June 23rd but this is dependent on the anticipated schedule of Mr Trump’s visit.

The group also said contact would be made with others in Shannon and Clare to coordinate simultaneous demonstrations.

“The message is one of ‘Trump Not Welcome - International Solidarity against racism, sexism and discrimination’,” it said in a statement on Tuesday.

It will involve migrant, women, disability and Muslim groups, as well as trade unions to support the protest. Further details will be announced at a press conference next week.

In June, 2004 about 1,000 people turned out to protest the arrival of US president George W Bush at Shannon ahead of an EU-US summit.