Minister ‘disappointed’ at lack of progress in dealing with NI past

Fianna Fáil Senator says 1,000 Troubles victims and families want independent inquiry

Minister of State for  Gaeltacht Affairs Seán Kyne said there was little visible progress in developing the institutions to be established under the 2014 Stormont House Agreement. Photograph: Toby Melville/Reuters

Minister of State for Gaeltacht Affairs Seán Kyne said there was little visible progress in developing the institutions to be established under the 2014 Stormont House Agreement. Photograph: Toby Melville/Reuters

 

Minister of State for Gaeltacht Affairs Seán Kyne has expressed the Government’s disappointment that no institutions are in place to the deal with legacy issues from the Troubles.

He told the Seanad on Tuesday it was deeply regrettable that while considerable work had been undertaken, there was little visible progress in developing the institutions to be established under the 2014 Stormont House Agreement.

“The Government shares the deep disappointment and frustration of victims and survivors of the Troubles from all communities who have had to wait for too long for access to truth and justice,’’ he added.

Mr Kyne, who was deputising for Minister for Foreign Affairs Charlie Flanagan, said the Government remained strongly committed to the establishment of the “architecture’’ for dealing with the legacy of the past provided for in the agreement and reflected in the programme for government.

“This system provides a framework for dealing comprehensively with the legacy of the past in a way that can bring whatever healing is possible to those affected by the Troubles,’’ he added.

Mr Kyne was replying to Fianna Fáil Senator Brian Ó Domhnaill who said 1,000 victims of the Troubles and their families were seeking justice in the form of an independent inquiry into their deaths.

“The United Nations has ruled against the British Conservative government on this particular issue because it continues to block the independent evaluation on the grounds that it prevents a risk to national security,’’ Mr Ó Domhnaill added.

“There are ways to mitigate any such risks.’’