Last surviving child of 1916 leader turns 101

Senator says families of 1916 families should be central to commemorations

 

A member of the all-party Decade of Commemorations Working Group has called on the public to convey birthday wishes to the last surviving child of a 1916 Rising leader.

Fr Joseph Mallin, who turns 101 today, is the son of Comdt Michael Mallin who was second in command of the Irish Citizen Army. He was only 2 years-old when his father was executed by firing squad in Kilmainham Gaol on May 8th, 1916.

Fianna Fáil senator Mark Daly, who made the call, said the families of those who participated in the events of 1916 should be central to the upcoming commemorations.

“As we enter the run up to the 100th anniversary of the 1916 Rising we must remember that the families of the volunteers should be central to all commemoration and celebrations, we must ensure the families of those who gave so much are at the centre of the commemorations for the 1916 Easter Rising,” senator Daly said.

As Chief of Staff of the ICA, Michael Mallin served under James Connolly and commanded the ICA garrison at St Stephen’s Green with Countess Markievicz during Easter Week.

While he has no memory of being taken to Kilmainham by his pregnant mother to say goodbye the night before the execution, Fr Mallin was remembered in a final letter written by his father.

“Joseph, my little man, be a priest if you can,” Cmdt Mallin wrote.

Michael Mallin was survived by his wife Agnes, his three sons and two daughters, the youngest of whom was not born until four months after his death.

Joseph subsequently became a priest and worked at the Wah Yan College, China, a Roman Catholic secondary school for boys run by the Society of Jesus.

Birthday wishes can be sent by email to Fr Seán Coughlan at treatysj@hku.hk; Fr John Russell at jruss@netbigator.com to the following postal address:

Fr Joseph Mallin

Wah Yan College,

281 Queen’s Road East,

Hong Kong,

China

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